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Human trafficking and health: a cross-sectional survey of NHS professionals' contact with victims of human trafficking.

Ross C, Dimitrova S, Howard LM, Dewey M, Zimmerman C, Oram S - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Psychometric analysis showed that subscales measuring perceived knowledge, actual knowledge and confidence to respond to human trafficking demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's αs 0.93, 0.63 and 0.64, respectively) and internal correlations.NHS professionals working in secondary care are in contact with potential victims of human trafficking, but lack knowledge and confidence in how to respond appropriately.Training is needed, particularly for maternity staff, on how to identify and respond to victims' needs, including through making safe referrals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King's College London, David Goldberg Centre, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Opinions about identifying and responding to trafficked people (n=782) (NHS, National Health Service).
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BMJOPEN2015008682F2: Opinions about identifying and responding to trafficked people (n=782) (NHS, National Health Service).

Mentions: As shown in figure 2, although 91% (n=697) respondents agreed that healthcare professionals have a responsibility to respond to suspected cases of human trafficking, 80% (n=613) reported that they had not received sufficient training to enable them to assist individuals in such situations. The majority did not feel confident of making appropriate referrals for trafficked women (n=528, 69%), men (n=556, 73%), and children (n=418, 55%).


Human trafficking and health: a cross-sectional survey of NHS professionals' contact with victims of human trafficking.

Ross C, Dimitrova S, Howard LM, Dewey M, Zimmerman C, Oram S - BMJ Open (2015)

Opinions about identifying and responding to trafficked people (n=782) (NHS, National Health Service).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4550705&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008682F2: Opinions about identifying and responding to trafficked people (n=782) (NHS, National Health Service).
Mentions: As shown in figure 2, although 91% (n=697) respondents agreed that healthcare professionals have a responsibility to respond to suspected cases of human trafficking, 80% (n=613) reported that they had not received sufficient training to enable them to assist individuals in such situations. The majority did not feel confident of making appropriate referrals for trafficked women (n=528, 69%), men (n=556, 73%), and children (n=418, 55%).

Bottom Line: Psychometric analysis showed that subscales measuring perceived knowledge, actual knowledge and confidence to respond to human trafficking demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's αs 0.93, 0.63 and 0.64, respectively) and internal correlations.NHS professionals working in secondary care are in contact with potential victims of human trafficking, but lack knowledge and confidence in how to respond appropriately.Training is needed, particularly for maternity staff, on how to identify and respond to victims' needs, including through making safe referrals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King's College London, David Goldberg Centre, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.