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Microbial community profiles of the colon from steers differing in feed efficiency.

Myer PR, Wells JE, Smith TP, Kuehn LA, Freetly HC - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: Relative abundances of microbial populations and operational taxonomic units did reveal significant differences between efficiency groups.Significant population shifts in taxa were detected, including the families Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Sphingomonadaceae, and the genera Butyrivibrio, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Prevotella, Faecalibacterium and Oscillospira.This study suggests the association of the colon microbial communities as a factor influencing feed efficiency at the 16S level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA, ARS, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, NE 68933 USA ; Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN USA.

ABSTRACT
Ruminal microbial fermentation plays an essential role in host nutrition, and as a result, the rumen microbiota have been a major focus of research examining bovine feed efficiency. Microbial communities within other sections of the gastrointestinal tract may also be important with regard to feed efficiency, since it is critical to the health and nutrition of the host. The objective of this study was to characterize the microbial communities of the colon among steers differing in feed efficiency. Individual feed intake (FI) and body weight (BW) gain were determined from animals fed the same ration, within two contemporary groups of steers. Four steers from each contemporary group within each Cartesian quadrant were sampled (n = 16/group) from the bivariate distribution of average daily BW gain and average daily FI. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons were sequenced from the colon content using next-generation sequencing technology. Within the colon content, UniFrac principal coordinate analyses did not detect any separation of microbial communities, and bacterial diversity or richness did not differ between efficiency groups. Relative abundances of microbial populations and operational taxonomic units did reveal significant differences between efficiency groups. The phylum Firmicutes accounted for up to 70% of the populations within all samples, and families Ruminococcaceae and Clostridiaceae were highly abundant. Significant population shifts in taxa were detected, including the families Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Sphingomonadaceae, and the genera Butyrivibrio, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Prevotella, Faecalibacterium and Oscillospira. This study suggests the association of the colon microbial communities as a factor influencing feed efficiency at the 16S level.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

UniFrac principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) displaying correlations among the bacterial communities of the 4 feed efficiency groups. a Weighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. b Unweighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. n = 8, represented by differing symbols: ADGHigh–ADFIHigh orange circle, ADGHigh–ADFILow blue triangle, ADGLow–ADFILow red square, ADGLow–ADFIHigh green triangle.
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Fig1: UniFrac principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) displaying correlations among the bacterial communities of the 4 feed efficiency groups. a Weighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. b Unweighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. n = 8, represented by differing symbols: ADGHigh–ADFIHigh orange circle, ADGHigh–ADFILow blue triangle, ADGLow–ADFILow red square, ADGLow–ADFIHigh green triangle.

Mentions: Principal coordinates analyses (PCoA) were conducted to determine the phylogenetic relationship between microbial community samples in the study (Fig. 1). The PCoA utilizes the phylogeny-based UniFrac method, which uses the detected OTUs to determine if the data separate into any sample clusters. This beta-diversity metric takes into account the phylogenetic divergence between the OTUs, in order to determine differences within the colonic microbial communities from each feed efficiency group (Lozupone et al. 2007). The analysis did not indicate any separation into clusters in both the weighted (quantitative) and unweighted (qualitative) UniFrac distances of the colon microbial communities (Lozupone et al. 2011).Fig. 1


Microbial community profiles of the colon from steers differing in feed efficiency.

Myer PR, Wells JE, Smith TP, Kuehn LA, Freetly HC - Springerplus (2015)

UniFrac principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) displaying correlations among the bacterial communities of the 4 feed efficiency groups. a Weighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. b Unweighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. n = 8, represented by differing symbols: ADGHigh–ADFIHigh orange circle, ADGHigh–ADFILow blue triangle, ADGLow–ADFILow red square, ADGLow–ADFIHigh green triangle.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549364&req=5

Fig1: UniFrac principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) displaying correlations among the bacterial communities of the 4 feed efficiency groups. a Weighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. b Unweighted PCoA analyzed from rarefied subsets of 100,000 sequences from each sample. n = 8, represented by differing symbols: ADGHigh–ADFIHigh orange circle, ADGHigh–ADFILow blue triangle, ADGLow–ADFILow red square, ADGLow–ADFIHigh green triangle.
Mentions: Principal coordinates analyses (PCoA) were conducted to determine the phylogenetic relationship between microbial community samples in the study (Fig. 1). The PCoA utilizes the phylogeny-based UniFrac method, which uses the detected OTUs to determine if the data separate into any sample clusters. This beta-diversity metric takes into account the phylogenetic divergence between the OTUs, in order to determine differences within the colonic microbial communities from each feed efficiency group (Lozupone et al. 2007). The analysis did not indicate any separation into clusters in both the weighted (quantitative) and unweighted (qualitative) UniFrac distances of the colon microbial communities (Lozupone et al. 2011).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Relative abundances of microbial populations and operational taxonomic units did reveal significant differences between efficiency groups.Significant population shifts in taxa were detected, including the families Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Sphingomonadaceae, and the genera Butyrivibrio, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Prevotella, Faecalibacterium and Oscillospira.This study suggests the association of the colon microbial communities as a factor influencing feed efficiency at the 16S level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA, ARS, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, NE 68933 USA ; Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN USA.

ABSTRACT
Ruminal microbial fermentation plays an essential role in host nutrition, and as a result, the rumen microbiota have been a major focus of research examining bovine feed efficiency. Microbial communities within other sections of the gastrointestinal tract may also be important with regard to feed efficiency, since it is critical to the health and nutrition of the host. The objective of this study was to characterize the microbial communities of the colon among steers differing in feed efficiency. Individual feed intake (FI) and body weight (BW) gain were determined from animals fed the same ration, within two contemporary groups of steers. Four steers from each contemporary group within each Cartesian quadrant were sampled (n = 16/group) from the bivariate distribution of average daily BW gain and average daily FI. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons were sequenced from the colon content using next-generation sequencing technology. Within the colon content, UniFrac principal coordinate analyses did not detect any separation of microbial communities, and bacterial diversity or richness did not differ between efficiency groups. Relative abundances of microbial populations and operational taxonomic units did reveal significant differences between efficiency groups. The phylum Firmicutes accounted for up to 70% of the populations within all samples, and families Ruminococcaceae and Clostridiaceae were highly abundant. Significant population shifts in taxa were detected, including the families Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Sphingomonadaceae, and the genera Butyrivibrio, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Prevotella, Faecalibacterium and Oscillospira. This study suggests the association of the colon microbial communities as a factor influencing feed efficiency at the 16S level.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus