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A review on potential neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

Song B, Liu J, Feng X, Wei L, Shao L - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects.The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration.However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different experimental parameters, including administration ways, dosage, size, and crystal structure of TiO2 NPs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guizhou Provincial People's Hospital, Guiyang, 550002, China, 17055224@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
As the rapid development of nanotechnology in the past three decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), for their peculiar physicochemical properties, are widely applied in consumer products, food additives, cosmetics, drug carriers, and so on. However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects. Once NPs are unintentionally exposed to human beings, they could be absorbed, and then accumulated in the brain regions by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or through the nose-to-brain pathway, potentially leading to dysfunctions of central nerve system (CNS). Besides, NPs may affect the brain development of embryo by crossing the placental barrier. A few in vivo and in vitro researches have demonstrated that the morphology and function of neuronal or glial cells could be impaired by TiO2 NPs which might induce cell necrosis. Cellular components, such as mitochondrial, lysosome, and cytoskeleton, could also be influenced as well. The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration. However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different experimental parameters, including administration ways, dosage, size, and crystal structure of TiO2 NPs. Therefore, in order to fully understand the potential risks of TiO2 NPs to brain health, figure out research areas where further studies are required, and improve its bio-safety for applications in the near future, how TiO2 NPs interact with the brain is investigated in this review by summarizing the current researches on neurotoxicity induced by TiO2 NPs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Substance exchange between the mother and fetus through placenta barrier
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Fig3: Substance exchange between the mother and fetus through placenta barrier

Mentions: Placental barrier, composed of both maternal and fetal tissues, is another internal barrier that can protect the development of embryo [61]. It could protect the fetus from being affected by harmful substances in maternal blood circulation, while the fetus could get nutrients and oxygen from the mother via the placenta (Fig. 3). However, a great number of studies [62, 63] have already revealed that after pregnant mice/rats were exposed to exogenous substances, such as nanoparticles, those substances could be detected in the brain of fetus, and then they can disturb the homeostasis of CNS or even induce neuronal death. Those harmful impacts on fetus brain have been demonstrated to be related with psychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, depression, and so on in their later life [64, 65]. As a consequence, those findings suggest that placental barrier plays an important part on fetal growth and development.Fig. 3


A review on potential neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

Song B, Liu J, Feng X, Wei L, Shao L - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Substance exchange between the mother and fetus through placenta barrier
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549355&req=5

Fig3: Substance exchange between the mother and fetus through placenta barrier
Mentions: Placental barrier, composed of both maternal and fetal tissues, is another internal barrier that can protect the development of embryo [61]. It could protect the fetus from being affected by harmful substances in maternal blood circulation, while the fetus could get nutrients and oxygen from the mother via the placenta (Fig. 3). However, a great number of studies [62, 63] have already revealed that after pregnant mice/rats were exposed to exogenous substances, such as nanoparticles, those substances could be detected in the brain of fetus, and then they can disturb the homeostasis of CNS or even induce neuronal death. Those harmful impacts on fetus brain have been demonstrated to be related with psychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, depression, and so on in their later life [64, 65]. As a consequence, those findings suggest that placental barrier plays an important part on fetal growth and development.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects.The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration.However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different experimental parameters, including administration ways, dosage, size, and crystal structure of TiO2 NPs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guizhou Provincial People's Hospital, Guiyang, 550002, China, 17055224@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
As the rapid development of nanotechnology in the past three decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), for their peculiar physicochemical properties, are widely applied in consumer products, food additives, cosmetics, drug carriers, and so on. However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects. Once NPs are unintentionally exposed to human beings, they could be absorbed, and then accumulated in the brain regions by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or through the nose-to-brain pathway, potentially leading to dysfunctions of central nerve system (CNS). Besides, NPs may affect the brain development of embryo by crossing the placental barrier. A few in vivo and in vitro researches have demonstrated that the morphology and function of neuronal or glial cells could be impaired by TiO2 NPs which might induce cell necrosis. Cellular components, such as mitochondrial, lysosome, and cytoskeleton, could also be influenced as well. The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration. However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different experimental parameters, including administration ways, dosage, size, and crystal structure of TiO2 NPs. Therefore, in order to fully understand the potential risks of TiO2 NPs to brain health, figure out research areas where further studies are required, and improve its bio-safety for applications in the near future, how TiO2 NPs interact with the brain is investigated in this review by summarizing the current researches on neurotoxicity induced by TiO2 NPs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus