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Evaluation of Tangential Flow Filtration for the Concentration and Separation of Bacteria and Viruses in Contrasting Marine Environments.

Cai L, Yang Y, Jiao N, Zhang R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Estuary samples showed significantly higher percentages of bacterial retention than nearshore and ocean samples.For virus-size membranes, a higher viral recovery and lower sorption was observed for regenerated cellulose membrane than PES membranes in the small-scale TFF.Similar viral recoveries were observed between PES membranes in the large-scale TFF, with higher viral concentrations being observed in estuary samples than in nearshore samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Institute of Marine Microbes and Ecospheres, Xiamen University (Xiang'an), Xiamen, Fujian, 361102, China.

ABSTRACT
Tangential flow filtration (TFF), which has been widely adopted to concentrate a diverse array of microbes from water, is a promising method of microbial separation or removal. However, it is essential to select an optimal membrane suitable for the specific filtration application. This study evaluated two different scales of TFF systems for concentrating and separating microbes (including bacteria and viruses) from contrasting marine waters. Among bacteria-size membranes, polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes showed higher bacterial recovery, but lower viral permeation efficiencies than polyethersulfone (PES) membranes, regardless of environments and scales of TFF. Estuary samples showed significantly higher percentages of bacterial retention than nearshore and ocean samples. For virus-size membranes, a higher viral recovery and lower sorption was observed for regenerated cellulose membrane than PES membranes in the small-scale TFF. Similar viral recoveries were observed between PES membranes in the large-scale TFF, with higher viral concentrations being observed in estuary samples than in nearshore samples. Deep ocean samples showed the lowest recovery of viruses, which was consistent with observations of bacterial recovery. Synthetically, PVDF may be more suitable for the concentration of bacterial cells, while PES would be a better choice for the collection of viruses. When compared with the PES membrane, regenerated cellulose is better for viral concentration, while PES is recommended to obtain bacteria- and virus-free seawater.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of samples from Station N2 in Xiamen coastal water (A) and Station WP5 in the western Pacific Ocean (B) in virus-like particle's Side Scatter (C) by flow cytometry.
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pone.0136741.g007: Comparison of samples from Station N2 in Xiamen coastal water (A) and Station WP5 in the western Pacific Ocean (B) in virus-like particle's Side Scatter (C) by flow cytometry.

Mentions: Spatially, a higher viral recovery was observed in estuary samples (average 40.82%) than nearshore samples (average 33.16%) during large-scale TFF, while no significant differences were observed between nearshore and surface ocean samples. Deep ocean samples showed the lowest of recovery viruses (average 27.12%), which was consistent with the bacterial recovery observed (Fig 6C). For small-scale TFF, the average viral recovery was 25.58% and 26.16% for nearshore and ocean samples, respectively, which was not significantly different. An average of 2.62% of viruses was detected in the viral filtrate of nearshore samples, while 31.64% of oceanic viral particles permeated through the filters (Fig 6A). This might have been because of the smaller size of viruses in the ocean samples, as indicated on the flow cytograms (Fig 7).


Evaluation of Tangential Flow Filtration for the Concentration and Separation of Bacteria and Viruses in Contrasting Marine Environments.

Cai L, Yang Y, Jiao N, Zhang R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Comparison of samples from Station N2 in Xiamen coastal water (A) and Station WP5 in the western Pacific Ocean (B) in virus-like particle's Side Scatter (C) by flow cytometry.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549332&req=5

pone.0136741.g007: Comparison of samples from Station N2 in Xiamen coastal water (A) and Station WP5 in the western Pacific Ocean (B) in virus-like particle's Side Scatter (C) by flow cytometry.
Mentions: Spatially, a higher viral recovery was observed in estuary samples (average 40.82%) than nearshore samples (average 33.16%) during large-scale TFF, while no significant differences were observed between nearshore and surface ocean samples. Deep ocean samples showed the lowest of recovery viruses (average 27.12%), which was consistent with the bacterial recovery observed (Fig 6C). For small-scale TFF, the average viral recovery was 25.58% and 26.16% for nearshore and ocean samples, respectively, which was not significantly different. An average of 2.62% of viruses was detected in the viral filtrate of nearshore samples, while 31.64% of oceanic viral particles permeated through the filters (Fig 6A). This might have been because of the smaller size of viruses in the ocean samples, as indicated on the flow cytograms (Fig 7).

Bottom Line: Estuary samples showed significantly higher percentages of bacterial retention than nearshore and ocean samples.For virus-size membranes, a higher viral recovery and lower sorption was observed for regenerated cellulose membrane than PES membranes in the small-scale TFF.Similar viral recoveries were observed between PES membranes in the large-scale TFF, with higher viral concentrations being observed in estuary samples than in nearshore samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Institute of Marine Microbes and Ecospheres, Xiamen University (Xiang'an), Xiamen, Fujian, 361102, China.

ABSTRACT
Tangential flow filtration (TFF), which has been widely adopted to concentrate a diverse array of microbes from water, is a promising method of microbial separation or removal. However, it is essential to select an optimal membrane suitable for the specific filtration application. This study evaluated two different scales of TFF systems for concentrating and separating microbes (including bacteria and viruses) from contrasting marine waters. Among bacteria-size membranes, polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes showed higher bacterial recovery, but lower viral permeation efficiencies than polyethersulfone (PES) membranes, regardless of environments and scales of TFF. Estuary samples showed significantly higher percentages of bacterial retention than nearshore and ocean samples. For virus-size membranes, a higher viral recovery and lower sorption was observed for regenerated cellulose membrane than PES membranes in the small-scale TFF. Similar viral recoveries were observed between PES membranes in the large-scale TFF, with higher viral concentrations being observed in estuary samples than in nearshore samples. Deep ocean samples showed the lowest recovery of viruses, which was consistent with observations of bacterial recovery. Synthetically, PVDF may be more suitable for the concentration of bacterial cells, while PES would be a better choice for the collection of viruses. When compared with the PES membrane, regenerated cellulose is better for viral concentration, while PES is recommended to obtain bacteria- and virus-free seawater.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus