Limits...
Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

Murphy RD, Scyphers SB, Grabowski JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%).However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers.By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may result from regulation changes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine and Environmental Science, Marine Science Center, Northeastern University, Nahant, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may result from regulation changes.

No MeSH data available.


Classification tree of fishers’ perceptions of management.Letters in each bubble correspond to the median grade for each group, while numbers represent the sample size. Variables predict grades based on their relative placement on the tree, where the highest variable explains the maximum variation. All splits shown are significant at P < 0.05 and were predicted according to LogWorth values.
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pone.0136412.g001: Classification tree of fishers’ perceptions of management.Letters in each bubble correspond to the median grade for each group, while numbers represent the sample size. Variables predict grades based on their relative placement on the tree, where the highest variable explains the maximum variation. All splits shown are significant at P < 0.05 and were predicted according to LogWorth values.

Mentions: Participants were asked to grade their state’s current management of the striped bass fishery on a typical A+ to F scale. Classification tree analysis revealed that “striped bass fishing experience” was the strongest predictor of angler management grade (Fig 1): those that have been fishing for fewer than 13 years assigned a median grade of a B, while those with 13 or more years of experience were slightly more critical and assigned a median score of a B-. For more experienced anglers, “fisher type” was the strongest explanatory variable. Commercial fishers and charter boat captains/guides were statistically non-distinct and gave management a B- grade, while recreational fishers assigned it a B. Commercial anglers and charter boat captains/guides could be further classified by fishing experience. Anglers with 49 years of experience or more had the lowest opinion of striped bass management with a median score of a C, compared with a median score of B- from those with less than 49 years. Lastly, recreational anglers’ degree of participation in tournaments was a predictor of their perceptions of the effectiveness of striped bass management efforts in their fishery: anglers that participated in a tournament were slightly less positive of management and assigned a median grade of a B-, compared to a B from the non-tournament anglers.


Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

Murphy RD, Scyphers SB, Grabowski JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Classification tree of fishers’ perceptions of management.Letters in each bubble correspond to the median grade for each group, while numbers represent the sample size. Variables predict grades based on their relative placement on the tree, where the highest variable explains the maximum variation. All splits shown are significant at P < 0.05 and were predicted according to LogWorth values.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549321&req=5

pone.0136412.g001: Classification tree of fishers’ perceptions of management.Letters in each bubble correspond to the median grade for each group, while numbers represent the sample size. Variables predict grades based on their relative placement on the tree, where the highest variable explains the maximum variation. All splits shown are significant at P < 0.05 and were predicted according to LogWorth values.
Mentions: Participants were asked to grade their state’s current management of the striped bass fishery on a typical A+ to F scale. Classification tree analysis revealed that “striped bass fishing experience” was the strongest predictor of angler management grade (Fig 1): those that have been fishing for fewer than 13 years assigned a median grade of a B, while those with 13 or more years of experience were slightly more critical and assigned a median score of a B-. For more experienced anglers, “fisher type” was the strongest explanatory variable. Commercial fishers and charter boat captains/guides were statistically non-distinct and gave management a B- grade, while recreational fishers assigned it a B. Commercial anglers and charter boat captains/guides could be further classified by fishing experience. Anglers with 49 years of experience or more had the lowest opinion of striped bass management with a median score of a C, compared with a median score of B- from those with less than 49 years. Lastly, recreational anglers’ degree of participation in tournaments was a predictor of their perceptions of the effectiveness of striped bass management efforts in their fishery: anglers that participated in a tournament were slightly less positive of management and assigned a median grade of a B-, compared to a B from the non-tournament anglers.

Bottom Line: Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%).However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers.By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may result from regulation changes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Marine and Environmental Science, Marine Science Center, Northeastern University, Nahant, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may result from regulation changes.

No MeSH data available.