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Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence.

Guo W, Ren J, Wang B, Zhu Q - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group.The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music.These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants' subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performance in a Go/NoGo task, were measured before and after the fatigue-inducing phase. A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group. The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music. Our results revealed that after the fatigue-inducing phase, (a) the music group demonstrated significantly less mental fatigue than control group, (b) reaction time significantly increased for the control group but not for the music group, (c) larger Go-P3 and NoGo-P3 amplitudes were observed in the music group, although larger NoGo-N2 amplitudes were detected for both groups. These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Grand-average ERPs at the Fz, Cz and Pz sites for Go trials as a function of condition and testing time.
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pone.0136446.g004: Grand-average ERPs at the Fz, Cz and Pz sites for Go trials as a function of condition and testing time.

Mentions: Fig 4 shows the grand-average ERPs at Fz, Cz and Pz for Go trials as a function of condition and time-on-task. The Go-P3 amplitudes at Fz and Cz sites significantly decreased after the fatigue-inducing task (F(1,34) = 4.70, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12; F(1,34) = 4.81, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12); The interaction between testing phase and condition at Cz sites was significant (F(1,34) = 4.44, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12); An interaction contrast at the Cz site indicated that the Go-P3 amplitude of the control group was smaller than that of the music group (4.52 mV, 6.16 mV) after the fatigue-inducing task. No main effect of condition was found. The Go-P3 latencies at the Fz, Cz, Pz sites all increased after the fatigue-inducing phase, but the main effect and interaction were not significant (See S3 Table for description of ERP data).


Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence.

Guo W, Ren J, Wang B, Zhu Q - PLoS ONE (2015)

Grand-average ERPs at the Fz, Cz and Pz sites for Go trials as a function of condition and testing time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549311&req=5

pone.0136446.g004: Grand-average ERPs at the Fz, Cz and Pz sites for Go trials as a function of condition and testing time.
Mentions: Fig 4 shows the grand-average ERPs at Fz, Cz and Pz for Go trials as a function of condition and time-on-task. The Go-P3 amplitudes at Fz and Cz sites significantly decreased after the fatigue-inducing task (F(1,34) = 4.70, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12; F(1,34) = 4.81, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12); The interaction between testing phase and condition at Cz sites was significant (F(1,34) = 4.44, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12); An interaction contrast at the Cz site indicated that the Go-P3 amplitude of the control group was smaller than that of the music group (4.52 mV, 6.16 mV) after the fatigue-inducing task. No main effect of condition was found. The Go-P3 latencies at the Fz, Cz, Pz sites all increased after the fatigue-inducing phase, but the main effect and interaction were not significant (See S3 Table for description of ERP data).

Bottom Line: A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group.The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music.These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants' subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performance in a Go/NoGo task, were measured before and after the fatigue-inducing phase. A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group. The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music. Our results revealed that after the fatigue-inducing phase, (a) the music group demonstrated significantly less mental fatigue than control group, (b) reaction time significantly increased for the control group but not for the music group, (c) larger Go-P3 and NoGo-P3 amplitudes were observed in the music group, although larger NoGo-N2 amplitudes were detected for both groups. These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus