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Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence.

Guo W, Ren J, Wang B, Zhu Q - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group.The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music.These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants' subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performance in a Go/NoGo task, were measured before and after the fatigue-inducing phase. A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group. The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music. Our results revealed that after the fatigue-inducing phase, (a) the music group demonstrated significantly less mental fatigue than control group, (b) reaction time significantly increased for the control group but not for the music group, (c) larger Go-P3 and NoGo-P3 amplitudes were observed in the music group, although larger NoGo-N2 amplitudes were detected for both groups. These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stimuli used in Go (the two pictures on the right) and NoGo (the two pictures on the left) task.
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pone.0136446.g001: Stimuli used in Go (the two pictures on the right) and NoGo (the two pictures on the left) task.

Mentions: A Go/NoGo paradigm was used to measure effect of mental fatigue. A computer screen (19inch) was positioned approximately 1m in front of the participants. The fixation point was a cross (1×1° of visual angle) displayed in the center of the screen for 1500ms. Four squared configurations subtending 4×4° were presented for 100ms on a dark background, and were displayed randomly with equal probability (p = 0.25), and a stimulus onset time of 800ms. Two configurations were defined as targets and two non-targets (Fig 1). The participants were instructed to press a button as quickly as possible with their right hand when the target appeared on the screen (Go stimuli; p = 0.5), and withhold responding when a non-target appeared (NoGo stimuli; p = 0.5). The task consisted of 4 blocks of 400 trials.


Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence.

Guo W, Ren J, Wang B, Zhu Q - PLoS ONE (2015)

Stimuli used in Go (the two pictures on the right) and NoGo (the two pictures on the left) task.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549311&req=5

pone.0136446.g001: Stimuli used in Go (the two pictures on the right) and NoGo (the two pictures on the left) task.
Mentions: A Go/NoGo paradigm was used to measure effect of mental fatigue. A computer screen (19inch) was positioned approximately 1m in front of the participants. The fixation point was a cross (1×1° of visual angle) displayed in the center of the screen for 1500ms. Four squared configurations subtending 4×4° were presented for 100ms on a dark background, and were displayed randomly with equal probability (p = 0.25), and a stimulus onset time of 800ms. Two configurations were defined as targets and two non-targets (Fig 1). The participants were instructed to press a button as quickly as possible with their right hand when the target appeared on the screen (Go stimuli; p = 0.5), and withhold responding when a non-target appeared (NoGo stimuli; p = 0.5). The task consisted of 4 blocks of 400 trials.

Bottom Line: A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group.The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music.These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants' subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performance in a Go/NoGo task, were measured before and after the fatigue-inducing phase. A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group. The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music. Our results revealed that after the fatigue-inducing phase, (a) the music group demonstrated significantly less mental fatigue than control group, (b) reaction time significantly increased for the control group but not for the music group, (c) larger Go-P3 and NoGo-P3 amplitudes were observed in the music group, although larger NoGo-N2 amplitudes were detected for both groups. These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus