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Residential Exposure to Road and Railway Noise and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Roswall N, Eriksen KT, Hjortebjerg D, Jensen SS, Overvad K, Tjønneland A, Raaschou-Nielsen O, Sørensen M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) were calculated as crude and adjusted for smoking status, education, socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar year, and traffic noise from other sources than the one investigated.This result persisted when stratifying cases by aggressiveness.There was no statistically significant effect modification by age, education, smoking status, waist circumference or railway noise, on the association between road traffic noise and prostate cancer, although there seemed to be a suggestion of an association among never smokers (IRR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.00-1.36).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Background: Few modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer are known. Recently, disruption of the circadian system has been proposed to affect risk, as it entails an inhibited melatonin production, and melatonin has demonstrated beneficial effects on cancer inhibition. This suggests a potential role of traffic noise in prostate cancer.

Methods: Road traffic and railway noise was calculated for all present and historical addresses from 1987-2010 for a cohort of 24,473 middle-aged, Danish men. During follow-up, 1,457 prostate cancer cases were identified. We used Cox Proportional Hazards Models to calculate the association between noise exposure and incident prostate cancer. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) were calculated as crude and adjusted for smoking status, education, socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar year, and traffic noise from other sources than the one investigated.

Results: There was no association between residential road traffic noise and risk of prostate cancer for any of the three exposure windows: 1, 5 or 10-year mean noise exposure before prostate cancer diagnosis. This result persisted when stratifying cases by aggressiveness. For railway noise, there was no association with overall prostate cancer. There was no statistically significant effect modification by age, education, smoking status, waist circumference or railway noise, on the association between road traffic noise and prostate cancer, although there seemed to be a suggestion of an association among never smokers (IRR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.00-1.36).

Conclusion: The present study does not support an overall association between either railway or road traffic noise and overall prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise (Lden) and risk for prostate cancer adjusted for smoking status, years of school attendance, area level socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar-year and railway noise and airport noise.
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pone.0135407.g002: Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise (Lden) and risk for prostate cancer adjusted for smoking status, years of school attendance, area level socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar-year and railway noise and airport noise.

Mentions: We found no associations between residential road traffic noise and risk of prostate cancer for any of the three exposure windows: 1, 5 or 10-year mean noise exposure before prostate cancer diagnosis (Table 2, Fig 2). Also, there were no associations between road traffic noise and subtypes of aggressiveness (information on aggressiveness was available until 2008, thus, lacking the 2 last years of the follow-up period).


Residential Exposure to Road and Railway Noise and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Roswall N, Eriksen KT, Hjortebjerg D, Jensen SS, Overvad K, Tjønneland A, Raaschou-Nielsen O, Sørensen M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise (Lden) and risk for prostate cancer adjusted for smoking status, years of school attendance, area level socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar-year and railway noise and airport noise.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549252&req=5

pone.0135407.g002: Association between residential exposure to road traffic noise (Lden) and risk for prostate cancer adjusted for smoking status, years of school attendance, area level socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar-year and railway noise and airport noise.
Mentions: We found no associations between residential road traffic noise and risk of prostate cancer for any of the three exposure windows: 1, 5 or 10-year mean noise exposure before prostate cancer diagnosis (Table 2, Fig 2). Also, there were no associations between road traffic noise and subtypes of aggressiveness (information on aggressiveness was available until 2008, thus, lacking the 2 last years of the follow-up period).

Bottom Line: Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) were calculated as crude and adjusted for smoking status, education, socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar year, and traffic noise from other sources than the one investigated.This result persisted when stratifying cases by aggressiveness.There was no statistically significant effect modification by age, education, smoking status, waist circumference or railway noise, on the association between road traffic noise and prostate cancer, although there seemed to be a suggestion of an association among never smokers (IRR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.00-1.36).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Background: Few modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer are known. Recently, disruption of the circadian system has been proposed to affect risk, as it entails an inhibited melatonin production, and melatonin has demonstrated beneficial effects on cancer inhibition. This suggests a potential role of traffic noise in prostate cancer.

Methods: Road traffic and railway noise was calculated for all present and historical addresses from 1987-2010 for a cohort of 24,473 middle-aged, Danish men. During follow-up, 1,457 prostate cancer cases were identified. We used Cox Proportional Hazards Models to calculate the association between noise exposure and incident prostate cancer. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) were calculated as crude and adjusted for smoking status, education, socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar year, and traffic noise from other sources than the one investigated.

Results: There was no association between residential road traffic noise and risk of prostate cancer for any of the three exposure windows: 1, 5 or 10-year mean noise exposure before prostate cancer diagnosis. This result persisted when stratifying cases by aggressiveness. For railway noise, there was no association with overall prostate cancer. There was no statistically significant effect modification by age, education, smoking status, waist circumference or railway noise, on the association between road traffic noise and prostate cancer, although there seemed to be a suggestion of an association among never smokers (IRR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.00-1.36).

Conclusion: The present study does not support an overall association between either railway or road traffic noise and overall prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus