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Health-Related Physical Fitness in Healthy Untrained Men: Effects on VO2max, Jump Performance and Flexibility of Soccer and Moderate-Intensity Continuous Running.

Milanović Z, Pantelić S, Sporiš G, Mohr M, Krustrup P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of recreational soccer (SOC) compared to moderate-intensity continuous running (RUN) on all health-related physical fitness components in healthy untrained men.In conclusion, untrained men displayed marked improvements in maximal aerobic power after 12 weeks of soccer training and moderate-intensity running, partly due to large decreases in body mass.Additionally soccer training induced pronounced positive effects on jump performance and flexibility, making soccer an effective broad-spectrum fitness training intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Niš, Niš, Serbia.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of recreational soccer (SOC) compared to moderate-intensity continuous running (RUN) on all health-related physical fitness components in healthy untrained men. Sixty-nine participants were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three groups, of which sixty-four completed the study: a soccer training group (SOC; n = 20, 34±4 (means±SD) years, 78.1±8.3 kg, 179±4 cm); a running group (RUN; n = 21, 32±4 years, 78.0±5.5 kg, 179±7 cm); or a passive control group (CON; n = 23, 30±3 years, 76.6±12.0 kg, 178±8 cm). The training intervention lasted 12 weeks and consisted of three 60-min sessions per week. All participants were tested for each of the following physical fitness components: maximal aerobic power, minute ventilation, maximal heart rate, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump with arm swing (CMJ), sit-and-reach flexibility, and body composition. Over the 12 weeks, VO2max relative to body weight increased more (p<0.05) in SOC (24.2%, ES = 1.20) and RUN (21.5%, ES = 1.17) than in CON (-5.0%, ES = -0.24), partly due to large changes in body mass (-5.9, -5.7 and +2.6 kg, p<0.05 for SOC, RUN and CON, respectively). Over the 12 weeks, SJ and CMJ performance increased more (p<0.05) in SOC (14.8 and 12.1%, ES = 1.08 and 0.81) than in RUN (3.3 and 3.0%, ES = 0.23 and 0.19) and CON (0.3 and 0.2%), while flexibility also increased more (p<0.05) in SOC (94%, ES = 0.97) than in RUN and CON (0-2%). In conclusion, untrained men displayed marked improvements in maximal aerobic power after 12 weeks of soccer training and moderate-intensity running, partly due to large decreases in body mass. Additionally soccer training induced pronounced positive effects on jump performance and flexibility, making soccer an effective broad-spectrum fitness training intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Flow chart diagram of participants’ enrolment, randomization and final analysis.
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pone.0135319.g001: Flow chart diagram of participants’ enrolment, randomization and final analysis.

Mentions: Sixty-nine healthy untrained males enrolled in this randomised controlled trial. Healthy, untrained, recreational, inactive and non-athletic men aged between 20 and 40 who were not suffering from any kind of acute or chronic diseases and had not participated in any type of regular physical training for at least 2 years were included. Exclusion criteria were: semi-active participants or semi-professional soccer players with any kind of training activity related to soccer; older than 40 years or younger than 20 years; any kind of injury within 3 months of the start of the training programme; female. All data related to inclusion and exclusion criteria were collected by a purposely designed questionnaire. Sixty-four participants completed the study after being randomly assigned to one of three groups: a soccer training group (SOC; n = 20); a running group (RUN; n = 21); or a control group performing no physical training (CON; n = 23). The process of enrollment, allocation, and drop-out as well as exclusion from analysis for any reason are shown in Fig 1. All subjects trained more than the minimum requirement of 50% of the training sessions for being included in the data treatment. For the participants who completed the study, no group differences were present at baseline. General descriptive parameters are presented in Table 1. The experimental protocol and associated risks were explained both orally and in writing to all subjects before they provided written consent. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Zagreb according to the Helsinki Declaration.


Health-Related Physical Fitness in Healthy Untrained Men: Effects on VO2max, Jump Performance and Flexibility of Soccer and Moderate-Intensity Continuous Running.

Milanović Z, Pantelić S, Sporiš G, Mohr M, Krustrup P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow chart diagram of participants’ enrolment, randomization and final analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549149&req=5

pone.0135319.g001: Flow chart diagram of participants’ enrolment, randomization and final analysis.
Mentions: Sixty-nine healthy untrained males enrolled in this randomised controlled trial. Healthy, untrained, recreational, inactive and non-athletic men aged between 20 and 40 who were not suffering from any kind of acute or chronic diseases and had not participated in any type of regular physical training for at least 2 years were included. Exclusion criteria were: semi-active participants or semi-professional soccer players with any kind of training activity related to soccer; older than 40 years or younger than 20 years; any kind of injury within 3 months of the start of the training programme; female. All data related to inclusion and exclusion criteria were collected by a purposely designed questionnaire. Sixty-four participants completed the study after being randomly assigned to one of three groups: a soccer training group (SOC; n = 20); a running group (RUN; n = 21); or a control group performing no physical training (CON; n = 23). The process of enrollment, allocation, and drop-out as well as exclusion from analysis for any reason are shown in Fig 1. All subjects trained more than the minimum requirement of 50% of the training sessions for being included in the data treatment. For the participants who completed the study, no group differences were present at baseline. General descriptive parameters are presented in Table 1. The experimental protocol and associated risks were explained both orally and in writing to all subjects before they provided written consent. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Zagreb according to the Helsinki Declaration.

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of recreational soccer (SOC) compared to moderate-intensity continuous running (RUN) on all health-related physical fitness components in healthy untrained men.In conclusion, untrained men displayed marked improvements in maximal aerobic power after 12 weeks of soccer training and moderate-intensity running, partly due to large decreases in body mass.Additionally soccer training induced pronounced positive effects on jump performance and flexibility, making soccer an effective broad-spectrum fitness training intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Niš, Niš, Serbia.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of recreational soccer (SOC) compared to moderate-intensity continuous running (RUN) on all health-related physical fitness components in healthy untrained men. Sixty-nine participants were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three groups, of which sixty-four completed the study: a soccer training group (SOC; n = 20, 34±4 (means±SD) years, 78.1±8.3 kg, 179±4 cm); a running group (RUN; n = 21, 32±4 years, 78.0±5.5 kg, 179±7 cm); or a passive control group (CON; n = 23, 30±3 years, 76.6±12.0 kg, 178±8 cm). The training intervention lasted 12 weeks and consisted of three 60-min sessions per week. All participants were tested for each of the following physical fitness components: maximal aerobic power, minute ventilation, maximal heart rate, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump with arm swing (CMJ), sit-and-reach flexibility, and body composition. Over the 12 weeks, VO2max relative to body weight increased more (p<0.05) in SOC (24.2%, ES = 1.20) and RUN (21.5%, ES = 1.17) than in CON (-5.0%, ES = -0.24), partly due to large changes in body mass (-5.9, -5.7 and +2.6 kg, p<0.05 for SOC, RUN and CON, respectively). Over the 12 weeks, SJ and CMJ performance increased more (p<0.05) in SOC (14.8 and 12.1%, ES = 1.08 and 0.81) than in RUN (3.3 and 3.0%, ES = 0.23 and 0.19) and CON (0.3 and 0.2%), while flexibility also increased more (p<0.05) in SOC (94%, ES = 0.97) than in RUN and CON (0-2%). In conclusion, untrained men displayed marked improvements in maximal aerobic power after 12 weeks of soccer training and moderate-intensity running, partly due to large decreases in body mass. Additionally soccer training induced pronounced positive effects on jump performance and flexibility, making soccer an effective broad-spectrum fitness training intervention.

No MeSH data available.