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Retrospective public health impact of a quadrivalent influenza vaccine in the United States.

Crépey P, de Boer PT, Postma MJ, Pitman R - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2015)

Bottom Line: Elderly (≥65 years) and young seniors (50-64 years) benefit most from QIV, with 21% and 18% reductions in B lineage cases.Reducing cross-protection to 50%, 30%, and 0% of the VE of the matched vaccine improves the relative benefit of QIV to 25%, 30%, and 34% less B lineage cases.Using a dynamic retrospective framework with real-life vaccine mismatch, our analysis shows that QIV routine vaccination in the United States has the potential to substantially reduce the number of influenza infections, even with relatively high estimates of TIV-induced cross-protection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: EHESP Rennes, Sorbonne Paris-cité, Paris, France.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram of the influenza B part of the dynamic model. E, exposed but not infectious; NXP, natural cross-protection; QIV, quadrivalent influenza vaccine; R, acquired an immunity to the disease (recovered); S, susceptible to infection; V, vaccination compartment; VXP, vaccine-induced cross-protection.
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fig01: Diagram of the influenza B part of the dynamic model. E, exposed but not infectious; NXP, natural cross-protection; QIV, quadrivalent influenza vaccine; R, acquired an immunity to the disease (recovered); S, susceptible to infection; V, vaccination compartment; VXP, vaccine-induced cross-protection.

Mentions: The model for influenza B, shown in Figure1, is built on the same initial principle as the model for influenza A. However, while no interaction is documented between A/H1N1 and A/H3N2, several studies have shown that both vaccine-induced and naturally acquired protection against a B lineage occur when a person is vaccinated against or infected by the other.2,10 The model accounts for such interactions by considering a second sequence of infection after each primary infection. Once individuals have been infected by one lineage, they shift to the R compartment corresponding to their infection. Then, they may be infected by the other lineage, but with a lower probability corresponding to the natural cross-protection they acquired with the primary infection. For vaccine-induced cross-protection, the process is similar: individuals protected against one lineage can be infected, with a lower probability, by the other lineage. In both cases, individuals will end up in a compartment where they will be immune to both kinds of infection for the duration of their naturally acquired immunity.


Retrospective public health impact of a quadrivalent influenza vaccine in the United States.

Crépey P, de Boer PT, Postma MJ, Pitman R - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2015)

Diagram of the influenza B part of the dynamic model. E, exposed but not infectious; NXP, natural cross-protection; QIV, quadrivalent influenza vaccine; R, acquired an immunity to the disease (recovered); S, susceptible to infection; V, vaccination compartment; VXP, vaccine-induced cross-protection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549101&req=5

fig01: Diagram of the influenza B part of the dynamic model. E, exposed but not infectious; NXP, natural cross-protection; QIV, quadrivalent influenza vaccine; R, acquired an immunity to the disease (recovered); S, susceptible to infection; V, vaccination compartment; VXP, vaccine-induced cross-protection.
Mentions: The model for influenza B, shown in Figure1, is built on the same initial principle as the model for influenza A. However, while no interaction is documented between A/H1N1 and A/H3N2, several studies have shown that both vaccine-induced and naturally acquired protection against a B lineage occur when a person is vaccinated against or infected by the other.2,10 The model accounts for such interactions by considering a second sequence of infection after each primary infection. Once individuals have been infected by one lineage, they shift to the R compartment corresponding to their infection. Then, they may be infected by the other lineage, but with a lower probability corresponding to the natural cross-protection they acquired with the primary infection. For vaccine-induced cross-protection, the process is similar: individuals protected against one lineage can be infected, with a lower probability, by the other lineage. In both cases, individuals will end up in a compartment where they will be immune to both kinds of infection for the duration of their naturally acquired immunity.

Bottom Line: Elderly (≥65 years) and young seniors (50-64 years) benefit most from QIV, with 21% and 18% reductions in B lineage cases.Reducing cross-protection to 50%, 30%, and 0% of the VE of the matched vaccine improves the relative benefit of QIV to 25%, 30%, and 34% less B lineage cases.Using a dynamic retrospective framework with real-life vaccine mismatch, our analysis shows that QIV routine vaccination in the United States has the potential to substantially reduce the number of influenza infections, even with relatively high estimates of TIV-induced cross-protection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: EHESP Rennes, Sorbonne Paris-cité, Paris, France.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus