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Translational aspects of cardiac cell therapy.

Chen CH, Sereti KI, Wu BM, Ardehali R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2015)

Bottom Line: Cell therapy has been intensely studied for over a decade as a potential treatment for ischaemic heart disease.An alternative strategy involving either direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts or stimulation of resident cardiomyocytes to regenerate new myocytes can potentially overcome the limitations of exogenous cell delivery.Complimentary approaches utilizing combination cell therapy and bioengineering techniques may be necessary to provide the proper milieu for clinically significant regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cell and tissue sources of cells for exogenous cell delivery. Multiple clinical trials have investigated non-cardiac cells including (A) skeletal myoblasts, (B) adipose-derived stem cells, and (D) bone marrow-derived stem cells, with limited evidence of cell engraftment or clinical efficacy. Clinical trials utilizing cells obtained from biopsied cardiac tissue (C) including cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells and cardiosphere-derived cells have provided the strongest evidence to date for clinical efficacy of exogenous cell therapy. Embryonic stem cells (E) and induced pluripotent stem cells (F) can be used as a source of cardiomyocytes potentially capable of electromechanical integration into native cardiac tissue.
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fig01: Cell and tissue sources of cells for exogenous cell delivery. Multiple clinical trials have investigated non-cardiac cells including (A) skeletal myoblasts, (B) adipose-derived stem cells, and (D) bone marrow-derived stem cells, with limited evidence of cell engraftment or clinical efficacy. Clinical trials utilizing cells obtained from biopsied cardiac tissue (C) including cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells and cardiosphere-derived cells have provided the strongest evidence to date for clinical efficacy of exogenous cell therapy. Embryonic stem cells (E) and induced pluripotent stem cells (F) can be used as a source of cardiomyocytes potentially capable of electromechanical integration into native cardiac tissue.

Mentions: A wide variety of stem cell types have been evaluated for therapeutic delivery for cardiac repair, ranging from unipotent skeletal myoblasts to pluripotent embryonic stem cells (Figure1). Starting with early studies utilizing skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells, the rationale for stem cell delivery was predicated on the speculation that ‘plasticity’ of adult stem cells may lead to transdifferentiation of these cell types into cardiomyocytes to ‘regenerate’ native damaged tissue. Although it is now understood that the positive effects of cell delivery on cardiac function in these early studies may have resulted from a paracrine effect rather than true cell engraftment and differentiation into cardiomyocytes, multiple pre-clinical and clinical studies have been performed demonstrating relative safety and modest efficacy of these cell types. With the discovery of cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells as well as advancements in pluripotent stem cell (PSC) derivation, there is now the possibility for delivery of cardiomyocyte progenitors and cardiomyocytes capable of true engraftment and regeneration of cardiac tissue. Many questions remain with exogenous cell delivery techniques, including the choice of the best cell type for therapeutic effect as well as proper delivery method, given the low engraftment rates as well as the propensity for arrhythmogenesis.


Translational aspects of cardiac cell therapy.

Chen CH, Sereti KI, Wu BM, Ardehali R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2015)

Cell and tissue sources of cells for exogenous cell delivery. Multiple clinical trials have investigated non-cardiac cells including (A) skeletal myoblasts, (B) adipose-derived stem cells, and (D) bone marrow-derived stem cells, with limited evidence of cell engraftment or clinical efficacy. Clinical trials utilizing cells obtained from biopsied cardiac tissue (C) including cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells and cardiosphere-derived cells have provided the strongest evidence to date for clinical efficacy of exogenous cell therapy. Embryonic stem cells (E) and induced pluripotent stem cells (F) can be used as a source of cardiomyocytes potentially capable of electromechanical integration into native cardiac tissue.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549027&req=5

fig01: Cell and tissue sources of cells for exogenous cell delivery. Multiple clinical trials have investigated non-cardiac cells including (A) skeletal myoblasts, (B) adipose-derived stem cells, and (D) bone marrow-derived stem cells, with limited evidence of cell engraftment or clinical efficacy. Clinical trials utilizing cells obtained from biopsied cardiac tissue (C) including cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells and cardiosphere-derived cells have provided the strongest evidence to date for clinical efficacy of exogenous cell therapy. Embryonic stem cells (E) and induced pluripotent stem cells (F) can be used as a source of cardiomyocytes potentially capable of electromechanical integration into native cardiac tissue.
Mentions: A wide variety of stem cell types have been evaluated for therapeutic delivery for cardiac repair, ranging from unipotent skeletal myoblasts to pluripotent embryonic stem cells (Figure1). Starting with early studies utilizing skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells, the rationale for stem cell delivery was predicated on the speculation that ‘plasticity’ of adult stem cells may lead to transdifferentiation of these cell types into cardiomyocytes to ‘regenerate’ native damaged tissue. Although it is now understood that the positive effects of cell delivery on cardiac function in these early studies may have resulted from a paracrine effect rather than true cell engraftment and differentiation into cardiomyocytes, multiple pre-clinical and clinical studies have been performed demonstrating relative safety and modest efficacy of these cell types. With the discovery of cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells as well as advancements in pluripotent stem cell (PSC) derivation, there is now the possibility for delivery of cardiomyocyte progenitors and cardiomyocytes capable of true engraftment and regeneration of cardiac tissue. Many questions remain with exogenous cell delivery techniques, including the choice of the best cell type for therapeutic effect as well as proper delivery method, given the low engraftment rates as well as the propensity for arrhythmogenesis.

Bottom Line: Cell therapy has been intensely studied for over a decade as a potential treatment for ischaemic heart disease.An alternative strategy involving either direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts or stimulation of resident cardiomyocytes to regenerate new myocytes can potentially overcome the limitations of exogenous cell delivery.Complimentary approaches utilizing combination cell therapy and bioengineering techniques may be necessary to provide the proper milieu for clinically significant regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus