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The enemy within: the association between self-image and eating disorder symptoms in healthy, non help-seeking and clinical young women.

Mantilla EF, Birgegård A - J Eat Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: We examined associations between self-reported self-image and ED symptoms in three groups of 16-25 year old females: healthy (N = 388), non help-seeking (N = 227) and clinical (N = 6384).Associations were generally weaker in the healthy groups and the older samples.We put forward that older age, low desirability of symptoms, poorly working symptoms, and being acknowledged as ill, may weaken the association, with implications for treatment and prevention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical neuroscience, Resource center for eating disorders, Norra Stationsgatan 69, plan 7, 113 64 Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous research has shown self-image according to the interpersonal Structural Analysis of Social Behavior model, to relate to and predict eating disorder symptoms and outcomes.

Methods: We examined associations between self-reported self-image and ED symptoms in three groups of 16-25 year old females: healthy (N = 388), non help-seeking (N = 227) and clinical (N = 6384). Analyses were divided into age groups of 16-18 and 19-25 years, and the patient sample was divided into diagnostic groups.

Results: Stepwise regressions with self-image aspects as independent variables and eating disorder symptoms as dependent showed that low self-love/acceptance and high self-blame were associated with more eating disorder symptoms in all groups, except older patients with bulimia nervosa where self-hate also contributed. Associations were generally weaker in the healthy groups and the older samples.

Conclusions: We put forward that older age, low desirability of symptoms, poorly working symptoms, and being acknowledged as ill, may weaken the association, with implications for treatment and prevention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The SASB Introject cluster model. The model displays the eight clusters and the two axes (Affiliation and Autonomy). From: Benjamin, L.S. (1996). Interpersonal diagnosis and treatment of personality disorders, 2nd Ed. N.Y.: The Guilford Press [13]. © The Guilford Press
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Fig1: The SASB Introject cluster model. The model displays the eight clusters and the two axes (Affiliation and Autonomy). From: Benjamin, L.S. (1996). Interpersonal diagnosis and treatment of personality disorders, 2nd Ed. N.Y.: The Guilford Press [13]. © The Guilford Press

Mentions: The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior, SASB [8, 9], is a model based on interpersonal- and attachment theory, and encompasses attachment behaviors, interpersonal behaviors and self-image. According to interpersonal theory [10], a persons’ self-image is formed in interaction with primary attachment figures and it influences subsequent interpersonal behavior. In the model, interpersonal behaviors are organized around two dimensions: Affiliation (love vs. hate) and Autonomy (control vs. autonomy). In the model there are three surfaces, each representing a specific focus of interpersonal behavior: surface 1, focusing on another person (transitive focus), surface 2, focusing on own reactions (intransitive focus) and surface 3, internalized actions towards oneself (introjection). Figure 1 shows the introject or self-image surface of the model, measuring self-treatment or self-directed behavior, with the two dimensions represented horizontally and vertically. Points along the perimeter represent combinations of the two underlying dimensions and form eight clusters. SASB self-image variables have been shown empirically to relate to attachment and social behavior in previous research, e.g. [11, 12].Fig. 1


The enemy within: the association between self-image and eating disorder symptoms in healthy, non help-seeking and clinical young women.

Mantilla EF, Birgegård A - J Eat Disord (2015)

The SASB Introject cluster model. The model displays the eight clusters and the two axes (Affiliation and Autonomy). From: Benjamin, L.S. (1996). Interpersonal diagnosis and treatment of personality disorders, 2nd Ed. N.Y.: The Guilford Press [13]. © The Guilford Press
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549025&req=5

Fig1: The SASB Introject cluster model. The model displays the eight clusters and the two axes (Affiliation and Autonomy). From: Benjamin, L.S. (1996). Interpersonal diagnosis and treatment of personality disorders, 2nd Ed. N.Y.: The Guilford Press [13]. © The Guilford Press
Mentions: The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior, SASB [8, 9], is a model based on interpersonal- and attachment theory, and encompasses attachment behaviors, interpersonal behaviors and self-image. According to interpersonal theory [10], a persons’ self-image is formed in interaction with primary attachment figures and it influences subsequent interpersonal behavior. In the model, interpersonal behaviors are organized around two dimensions: Affiliation (love vs. hate) and Autonomy (control vs. autonomy). In the model there are three surfaces, each representing a specific focus of interpersonal behavior: surface 1, focusing on another person (transitive focus), surface 2, focusing on own reactions (intransitive focus) and surface 3, internalized actions towards oneself (introjection). Figure 1 shows the introject or self-image surface of the model, measuring self-treatment or self-directed behavior, with the two dimensions represented horizontally and vertically. Points along the perimeter represent combinations of the two underlying dimensions and form eight clusters. SASB self-image variables have been shown empirically to relate to attachment and social behavior in previous research, e.g. [11, 12].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We examined associations between self-reported self-image and ED symptoms in three groups of 16-25 year old females: healthy (N = 388), non help-seeking (N = 227) and clinical (N = 6384).Associations were generally weaker in the healthy groups and the older samples.We put forward that older age, low desirability of symptoms, poorly working symptoms, and being acknowledged as ill, may weaken the association, with implications for treatment and prevention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical neuroscience, Resource center for eating disorders, Norra Stationsgatan 69, plan 7, 113 64 Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous research has shown self-image according to the interpersonal Structural Analysis of Social Behavior model, to relate to and predict eating disorder symptoms and outcomes.

Methods: We examined associations between self-reported self-image and ED symptoms in three groups of 16-25 year old females: healthy (N = 388), non help-seeking (N = 227) and clinical (N = 6384). Analyses were divided into age groups of 16-18 and 19-25 years, and the patient sample was divided into diagnostic groups.

Results: Stepwise regressions with self-image aspects as independent variables and eating disorder symptoms as dependent showed that low self-love/acceptance and high self-blame were associated with more eating disorder symptoms in all groups, except older patients with bulimia nervosa where self-hate also contributed. Associations were generally weaker in the healthy groups and the older samples.

Conclusions: We put forward that older age, low desirability of symptoms, poorly working symptoms, and being acknowledged as ill, may weaken the association, with implications for treatment and prevention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus