Limits...
Associations between intimate partner violence, childcare practices and infant health: findings from Demographic and Health Surveys in Bolivia, Colombia and Peru.

Urke HB, Mittelmark MB - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The study found weak but persistent effects of IPV on illness signs in Bolivia (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.63) and Peru (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.26-1.77), after adjusting for the effects of childcare.These effects were not observed in Colombia.Can poor childcare exacerbate the negative effects of IPV?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion and Development, University of Bergen, Christies gate 13, 5020, Bergen, Norway. helga.urke@uib.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Child health is significantly poorer in homes with intimate partner violence (IPV). However, a possible link to parental provision of childcare has been neglected.

Methods: Utilizing data from Demographic and Health Surveys, this study examined the association between IPV and illness signs in children 0-59 months in Bolivia (n = 3586), Colombia (n = 9955) and Peru (n = 6260), taking into account socio-demographic factors, childcare and severe child physical punishment. Data were collected in the years 2008, 2010 and 2012 for Bolivia, Colombia and Peru respectively.

Results: The study found weak but persistent effects of IPV on illness signs in Bolivia (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.63) and Peru (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.26-1.77), after adjusting for the effects of childcare. These effects were not observed in Colombia.

Conclusions: The results call for a mix of qualitative and quantitative research that can map direct, mediating and moderating patterns of relationships between IPV, childcare practices and child health. Can good childcare mitigate the negative effects of IPV? Can poor childcare exacerbate the negative effects of IPV? Such interactions were not observed in the present study, but should be the focus of much more intensive investigation, to help inform child health promotion. Answers could lead to better interventions to improve child health, and perhaps to tackle IPV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Model of childcare.a Adapted by the Research Unit for Social Determinants of Health in Very Poor Ruralities (MB Mittelmark Director), University of Bergen Research Group Multicultural Venues in Health, Gender and Social Justice (http://www.uib.no/rg/mcvenues), from UNICEF, 1990 [44]; Engle Menon and Haddad, 1999 [45]; Smith and Haddad, 2000 [46]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549006&req=5

Fig1: Model of childcare.a Adapted by the Research Unit for Social Determinants of Health in Very Poor Ruralities (MB Mittelmark Director), University of Bergen Research Group Multicultural Venues in Health, Gender and Social Justice (http://www.uib.no/rg/mcvenues), from UNICEF, 1990 [44]; Engle Menon and Haddad, 1999 [45]; Smith and Haddad, 2000 [46]

Mentions: As emphasized by Yount et al. [21], the possible influences and pathways by which IPV might influence a child’s physical health are multiple. Figure 1 presents a framework of childcare [22, 23]. In the framework, child health and development is the ultimate end point. This end point is affected by a range of factors on several levels. The most proximate factors are genes (arrow a), happenstance (arrow d) and childcare (arrow b). Genes and happenstance are not in focus in this study. Childcare is affected by a range of other, more intermediate factors like food security resources, maternal resources and infrastructure resources (arrows e). These all work through childcare to affect child health and development.Fig 1


Associations between intimate partner violence, childcare practices and infant health: findings from Demographic and Health Surveys in Bolivia, Colombia and Peru.

Urke HB, Mittelmark MB - BMC Public Health (2015)

Model of childcare.a Adapted by the Research Unit for Social Determinants of Health in Very Poor Ruralities (MB Mittelmark Director), University of Bergen Research Group Multicultural Venues in Health, Gender and Social Justice (http://www.uib.no/rg/mcvenues), from UNICEF, 1990 [44]; Engle Menon and Haddad, 1999 [45]; Smith and Haddad, 2000 [46]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4549006&req=5

Fig1: Model of childcare.a Adapted by the Research Unit for Social Determinants of Health in Very Poor Ruralities (MB Mittelmark Director), University of Bergen Research Group Multicultural Venues in Health, Gender and Social Justice (http://www.uib.no/rg/mcvenues), from UNICEF, 1990 [44]; Engle Menon and Haddad, 1999 [45]; Smith and Haddad, 2000 [46]
Mentions: As emphasized by Yount et al. [21], the possible influences and pathways by which IPV might influence a child’s physical health are multiple. Figure 1 presents a framework of childcare [22, 23]. In the framework, child health and development is the ultimate end point. This end point is affected by a range of factors on several levels. The most proximate factors are genes (arrow a), happenstance (arrow d) and childcare (arrow b). Genes and happenstance are not in focus in this study. Childcare is affected by a range of other, more intermediate factors like food security resources, maternal resources and infrastructure resources (arrows e). These all work through childcare to affect child health and development.Fig 1

Bottom Line: The study found weak but persistent effects of IPV on illness signs in Bolivia (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.63) and Peru (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.26-1.77), after adjusting for the effects of childcare.These effects were not observed in Colombia.Can poor childcare exacerbate the negative effects of IPV?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion and Development, University of Bergen, Christies gate 13, 5020, Bergen, Norway. helga.urke@uib.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Child health is significantly poorer in homes with intimate partner violence (IPV). However, a possible link to parental provision of childcare has been neglected.

Methods: Utilizing data from Demographic and Health Surveys, this study examined the association between IPV and illness signs in children 0-59 months in Bolivia (n = 3586), Colombia (n = 9955) and Peru (n = 6260), taking into account socio-demographic factors, childcare and severe child physical punishment. Data were collected in the years 2008, 2010 and 2012 for Bolivia, Colombia and Peru respectively.

Results: The study found weak but persistent effects of IPV on illness signs in Bolivia (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.63) and Peru (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.26-1.77), after adjusting for the effects of childcare. These effects were not observed in Colombia.

Conclusions: The results call for a mix of qualitative and quantitative research that can map direct, mediating and moderating patterns of relationships between IPV, childcare practices and child health. Can good childcare mitigate the negative effects of IPV? Can poor childcare exacerbate the negative effects of IPV? Such interactions were not observed in the present study, but should be the focus of much more intensive investigation, to help inform child health promotion. Answers could lead to better interventions to improve child health, and perhaps to tackle IPV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus