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Parental perceptions and predictors of consent for school-located influenza vaccination in urban elementary school children in the United States.

Cheung S, Wang HL, Mascola L, El Amin AN, Pannaraj PS - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2015)

Bottom Line: Parental consent for 2009 H1N1, 2009 seasonal, and 2010 seasonal influenza vaccines was obtained from 738 (70·8%), 673 (64·5%), and 1151 (77·2%) respondents, respectively.In both years, college-educated parents were more likely to perceive vaccine risks (year 1: 83·6 versus 61·5%, P < 0·001 and year 2: 81·1% versus 60·6%, P < 0·001) and less likely to consent for seasonal influenza vaccine (year 1: OR 0·69, 95% CI:0·53-0·89 and year 2: OR 0·61, 95% CI:0·47-0·78) compared to non-college-educated parents.More research is needed to determine how to address heightened safety concerns among college-educated parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Perceptions of survey respondents regarding the seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza illness and vaccine for the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 seasons.
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fig01: Perceptions of survey respondents regarding the seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza illness and vaccine for the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 seasons.

Mentions: Perceptions of 2009 H1N1 influenza were assessed separately from seasonal influenza during year 1 because the survey was distributed during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Figure1 displays answers to questions regarding perceived susceptibility and severity to influenza illness and perceived benefit and risk of the vaccines. A high number of respondents felt uncertain about 2009 H1N1 influenza illness and vaccination as reflected by answers of “I don’t know” by 42·0–43·8% responders. Perceptions on susceptibility and severity were similar among parents of all races/ethnicities. However, Asian respondents were more likely to believe that vaccination would prevent infection (84·5 versus 67·1%, P < 0·001), while Hispanic respondents were more concerned about vaccine safety (85·9 versus 79·0%, P = 0·021). College-educated compared to non-college-educated respondents were more likely to believe that the 2009 H1N1 influenza could cause a severe infection (87·2 versus 80·8%, P < 0·023), but also were more concerned regarding vaccine safety (91·3 versus 73·7%, P < 0·001).


Parental perceptions and predictors of consent for school-located influenza vaccination in urban elementary school children in the United States.

Cheung S, Wang HL, Mascola L, El Amin AN, Pannaraj PS - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2015)

Perceptions of survey respondents regarding the seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza illness and vaccine for the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 seasons.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548995&req=5

fig01: Perceptions of survey respondents regarding the seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza illness and vaccine for the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 seasons.
Mentions: Perceptions of 2009 H1N1 influenza were assessed separately from seasonal influenza during year 1 because the survey was distributed during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Figure1 displays answers to questions regarding perceived susceptibility and severity to influenza illness and perceived benefit and risk of the vaccines. A high number of respondents felt uncertain about 2009 H1N1 influenza illness and vaccination as reflected by answers of “I don’t know” by 42·0–43·8% responders. Perceptions on susceptibility and severity were similar among parents of all races/ethnicities. However, Asian respondents were more likely to believe that vaccination would prevent infection (84·5 versus 67·1%, P < 0·001), while Hispanic respondents were more concerned about vaccine safety (85·9 versus 79·0%, P = 0·021). College-educated compared to non-college-educated respondents were more likely to believe that the 2009 H1N1 influenza could cause a severe infection (87·2 versus 80·8%, P < 0·023), but also were more concerned regarding vaccine safety (91·3 versus 73·7%, P < 0·001).

Bottom Line: Parental consent for 2009 H1N1, 2009 seasonal, and 2010 seasonal influenza vaccines was obtained from 738 (70·8%), 673 (64·5%), and 1151 (77·2%) respondents, respectively.In both years, college-educated parents were more likely to perceive vaccine risks (year 1: 83·6 versus 61·5%, P < 0·001 and year 2: 81·1% versus 60·6%, P < 0·001) and less likely to consent for seasonal influenza vaccine (year 1: OR 0·69, 95% CI:0·53-0·89 and year 2: OR 0·61, 95% CI:0·47-0·78) compared to non-college-educated parents.More research is needed to determine how to address heightened safety concerns among college-educated parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus