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Factors associated with transmission of influenza-like illness in a cohort of households containing multiple children.

Brown CR, McCaw JM, Fairmaid EJ, Brown LE, Leder K, Sinclair M, McVernon J - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2015)

Bottom Line: A date of illness onset during the influenza season was used as a proxy indicator of ILI associated with influenza infection (as opposed to other aetiological causes).Transmission of ILI was significantly associated with the onset of ILI in the index case during the peak influenza season compared with the remainder of the observation period (37% versus 27%, odds ratio = 1·59, 95% CI 1·09, 2·31, P = 0·017).In this cohort, secondary-school-aged children and adults were important transmitters of ILI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic., Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Influenza A laboratory reports, by week, ACT, NSW, Tasmania and Victoria, 1998 (modified from Ref. 13). The Victorian influenza season is highlighted in yellow and the study period indicated by the vertical bars. (B) Incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) in the cohort over the study period.
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fig01: (A) Influenza A laboratory reports, by week, ACT, NSW, Tasmania and Victoria, 1998 (modified from Ref. 13). The Victorian influenza season is highlighted in yellow and the study period indicated by the vertical bars. (B) Incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) in the cohort over the study period.

Mentions: The Australian National Influenza Surveillance Scheme reported that 95% of the laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza in 1998 were identified as influenza A/Sydney/5/97 (H3N2). Surveillance data for 1998 (Figure1) indicate that there was a peak in the number of laboratory-confirmed influenza A (H3N2) cases in Victoria early in the influenza season between weeks 26 and 29 of 1998. These weeks correspond to the 4-week period spanning the 21st of June to the 18th of July in 1998. This 4-week period is referred to as the ‘peak period’ of the 1998 influenza season throughout this article. The A/Sydney/5/97 (H3N2) virus was antigenically similar to the emergent H3N2 variant that co-circulated with the earlier A/Wuhan/359/95 (H3N2) and influenza B strains in the 1997 season.12


Factors associated with transmission of influenza-like illness in a cohort of households containing multiple children.

Brown CR, McCaw JM, Fairmaid EJ, Brown LE, Leder K, Sinclair M, McVernon J - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2015)

(A) Influenza A laboratory reports, by week, ACT, NSW, Tasmania and Victoria, 1998 (modified from Ref. 13). The Victorian influenza season is highlighted in yellow and the study period indicated by the vertical bars. (B) Incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) in the cohort over the study period.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548994&req=5

fig01: (A) Influenza A laboratory reports, by week, ACT, NSW, Tasmania and Victoria, 1998 (modified from Ref. 13). The Victorian influenza season is highlighted in yellow and the study period indicated by the vertical bars. (B) Incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) in the cohort over the study period.
Mentions: The Australian National Influenza Surveillance Scheme reported that 95% of the laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza in 1998 were identified as influenza A/Sydney/5/97 (H3N2). Surveillance data for 1998 (Figure1) indicate that there was a peak in the number of laboratory-confirmed influenza A (H3N2) cases in Victoria early in the influenza season between weeks 26 and 29 of 1998. These weeks correspond to the 4-week period spanning the 21st of June to the 18th of July in 1998. This 4-week period is referred to as the ‘peak period’ of the 1998 influenza season throughout this article. The A/Sydney/5/97 (H3N2) virus was antigenically similar to the emergent H3N2 variant that co-circulated with the earlier A/Wuhan/359/95 (H3N2) and influenza B strains in the 1997 season.12

Bottom Line: A date of illness onset during the influenza season was used as a proxy indicator of ILI associated with influenza infection (as opposed to other aetiological causes).Transmission of ILI was significantly associated with the onset of ILI in the index case during the peak influenza season compared with the remainder of the observation period (37% versus 27%, odds ratio = 1·59, 95% CI 1·09, 2·31, P = 0·017).In this cohort, secondary-school-aged children and adults were important transmitters of ILI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic., Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus