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Long-term functional and radiographic outcomes in 243 operated ankle fractures.

Verhage SM, Schipper IB, Hoogendoorn JM - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Bottom Line: In addition, no functional differences were found between bimalleolar and trimalleolar fractures.Surprisingly, poor outcomes were found for isolated medial malleolar fractures.The results of our study show that long-term functional outcome is strongly associated to medial malleolar fractures, isolated or as part of bi- or trimalleolar fractures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MC Haaglanden, Department of Surgery, Postbus 432, 2501 CK The Hague, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Large comparative studies that have evaluated long-term functional outcome of operatively treated ankle fractures are lacking. This study was performed to analyse the influence of several combinations of malleolar fractures on long-term functional outcome and development of osteoarthritis.

Methods: Retrospective cohort-study on operated (1995-2007) malleolar fractures. Results were assessed with use of the AAOS- and AOFAS-questionnaires, VAS-pain score, dorsiflexion restriction (range of motion) and osteoarthritis. Categorisation was determined using the number of malleoli involved.

Results: 243 participants with a mean follow-up of 9.6 years were included. Significant differences for all outcomes were found between unimalleolar (isolated fibular) and bimalleolar (a combination of fibular and medial) fractures (AOFAS 97 vs 91, p = 0.035; AAOS 97 vs 90, p = 0.026; dorsiflexion restriction 2.8° vs 6.7°, p = 0.003). Outcomes after fibular fractures with an additional posterior fragment were similar to isolated fibular fractures. However, significant differences were found between unimalleolar and trimalleolar (a combination of lateral, medial and posterior) fractures (AOFAS 97 vs 88, p < 0.001; AAOS 97 vs 90, p = 0.003; VAS-pain 1.1 vs 2.3 p < 0.001; dorsiflexion restriction 2.9° vs 6.9°, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in isolated fibular fractures with or without additional deltoid ligament injury. In addition, no functional differences were found between bimalleolar and trimalleolar fractures. Surprisingly, poor outcomes were found for isolated medial malleolar fractures. Development of osteoarthritis occurred mainly in trimalleolar fractures with a posterior fragment larger than 5 %.

Conclusions: The results of our study show that long-term functional outcome is strongly associated to medial malleolar fractures, isolated or as part of bi- or trimalleolar fractures. More cases of osteoarthritis are found in trimalleolar fractures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Measuring maximal dorsiflexion of the injured and healthy ankle
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig2: Measuring maximal dorsiflexion of the injured and healthy ankle

Mentions: Baseline participant characteristics as well as data on operation delay, immobilisation duration, fixation technique and complications were obtained from the hospital records. The participants were seen at the outpatient clinic where physical examination was performed including range of motion, two questionnaires to assess functional outcome and x-rays of the injured ankle to assess osteoarthritis (mortise and lateral) were performed. Maximum dorsiflexion was measured using a goniometer after the patient had placed the affected foot on a 2.5 cm elevation (Fig. 2). This was done for both ankles and the difference was registered as dorsiflexion restriction, which is mostly limited if ankle problems exists.Fig. 2


Long-term functional and radiographic outcomes in 243 operated ankle fractures.

Verhage SM, Schipper IB, Hoogendoorn JM - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Measuring maximal dorsiflexion of the injured and healthy ankle
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548913&req=5

Fig2: Measuring maximal dorsiflexion of the injured and healthy ankle
Mentions: Baseline participant characteristics as well as data on operation delay, immobilisation duration, fixation technique and complications were obtained from the hospital records. The participants were seen at the outpatient clinic where physical examination was performed including range of motion, two questionnaires to assess functional outcome and x-rays of the injured ankle to assess osteoarthritis (mortise and lateral) were performed. Maximum dorsiflexion was measured using a goniometer after the patient had placed the affected foot on a 2.5 cm elevation (Fig. 2). This was done for both ankles and the difference was registered as dorsiflexion restriction, which is mostly limited if ankle problems exists.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: In addition, no functional differences were found between bimalleolar and trimalleolar fractures.Surprisingly, poor outcomes were found for isolated medial malleolar fractures.The results of our study show that long-term functional outcome is strongly associated to medial malleolar fractures, isolated or as part of bi- or trimalleolar fractures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MC Haaglanden, Department of Surgery, Postbus 432, 2501 CK The Hague, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Large comparative studies that have evaluated long-term functional outcome of operatively treated ankle fractures are lacking. This study was performed to analyse the influence of several combinations of malleolar fractures on long-term functional outcome and development of osteoarthritis.

Methods: Retrospective cohort-study on operated (1995-2007) malleolar fractures. Results were assessed with use of the AAOS- and AOFAS-questionnaires, VAS-pain score, dorsiflexion restriction (range of motion) and osteoarthritis. Categorisation was determined using the number of malleoli involved.

Results: 243 participants with a mean follow-up of 9.6 years were included. Significant differences for all outcomes were found between unimalleolar (isolated fibular) and bimalleolar (a combination of fibular and medial) fractures (AOFAS 97 vs 91, p = 0.035; AAOS 97 vs 90, p = 0.026; dorsiflexion restriction 2.8° vs 6.7°, p = 0.003). Outcomes after fibular fractures with an additional posterior fragment were similar to isolated fibular fractures. However, significant differences were found between unimalleolar and trimalleolar (a combination of lateral, medial and posterior) fractures (AOFAS 97 vs 88, p < 0.001; AAOS 97 vs 90, p = 0.003; VAS-pain 1.1 vs 2.3 p < 0.001; dorsiflexion restriction 2.9° vs 6.9°, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in isolated fibular fractures with or without additional deltoid ligament injury. In addition, no functional differences were found between bimalleolar and trimalleolar fractures. Surprisingly, poor outcomes were found for isolated medial malleolar fractures. Development of osteoarthritis occurred mainly in trimalleolar fractures with a posterior fragment larger than 5 %.

Conclusions: The results of our study show that long-term functional outcome is strongly associated to medial malleolar fractures, isolated or as part of bi- or trimalleolar fractures. More cases of osteoarthritis are found in trimalleolar fractures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus