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Visualizing genome and systems biology: technologies, tools, implementation techniques and trends, past, present and future.

Pavlopoulos GA, Malliarakis D, Papanikolaou N, Theodosiou T, Enright AJ, Iliopoulos I - Gigascience (2015)

Bottom Line: "Α picture is worth a thousand words." This widely used adage sums up in a few words the notion that a successful visual representation of a concept should enable easy and rapid absorption of large amounts of information.We briefly comment on many visualization and analysis tools and the purposes that they serve.We focus on the latest libraries and programming languages that enable more effective, efficient and faster approaches for visualizing biological concepts, and also comment on the future human-computer interaction trends that would enable for enhancing visualization further.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Laboratory, Division of Basic Sciences, University of Crete, Medical School, 70013 Heraklion, Crete Greece.

ABSTRACT
"Α picture is worth a thousand words." This widely used adage sums up in a few words the notion that a successful visual representation of a concept should enable easy and rapid absorption of large amounts of information. Although, in general, the notion of capturing complex ideas using images is very appealing, would 1000 words be enough to describe the unknown in a research field such as the life sciences? Life sciences is one of the biggest generators of enormous datasets, mainly as a result of recent and rapid technological advances; their complexity can make these datasets incomprehensible without effective visualization methods. Here we discuss the past, present and future of genomic and systems biology visualization. We briefly comment on many visualization and analysis tools and the purposes that they serve. We focus on the latest libraries and programming languages that enable more effective, efficient and faster approaches for visualizing biological concepts, and also comment on the future human-computer interaction trends that would enable for enhancing visualization further.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Visualization for genome biology. a Timeline of the emergence of relevant technologies and concepts. b A typical normal human karyotype. c Visualization of BLAST hits and alignment of orthologous genes for the human TP53 gene. d The human TP53 gene and its annotations visualized by the UCSC genome browser. e Visualization of a de novo genome assembly from its DNA fragments. f Examples of balanced and unbalanced genomic rearrangements. g Hypothetical visualization of genomic structural variations across time
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Fig3: Visualization for genome biology. a Timeline of the emergence of relevant technologies and concepts. b A typical normal human karyotype. c Visualization of BLAST hits and alignment of orthologous genes for the human TP53 gene. d The human TP53 gene and its annotations visualized by the UCSC genome browser. e Visualization of a de novo genome assembly from its DNA fragments. f Examples of balanced and unbalanced genomic rearrangements. g Hypothetical visualization of genomic structural variations across time

Mentions: There remain many open challenges for advanced visualization for genome assemblies, alignments, polymorphisms, variations, synteny, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rearrangements and annotations [66, 67]. To better follow progress in the visualization field, we first need to follow the way in which new technologies, questions and trends have been shaped over the years (Fig. 3).Fig. 3


Visualizing genome and systems biology: technologies, tools, implementation techniques and trends, past, present and future.

Pavlopoulos GA, Malliarakis D, Papanikolaou N, Theodosiou T, Enright AJ, Iliopoulos I - Gigascience (2015)

Visualization for genome biology. a Timeline of the emergence of relevant technologies and concepts. b A typical normal human karyotype. c Visualization of BLAST hits and alignment of orthologous genes for the human TP53 gene. d The human TP53 gene and its annotations visualized by the UCSC genome browser. e Visualization of a de novo genome assembly from its DNA fragments. f Examples of balanced and unbalanced genomic rearrangements. g Hypothetical visualization of genomic structural variations across time
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548842&req=5

Fig3: Visualization for genome biology. a Timeline of the emergence of relevant technologies and concepts. b A typical normal human karyotype. c Visualization of BLAST hits and alignment of orthologous genes for the human TP53 gene. d The human TP53 gene and its annotations visualized by the UCSC genome browser. e Visualization of a de novo genome assembly from its DNA fragments. f Examples of balanced and unbalanced genomic rearrangements. g Hypothetical visualization of genomic structural variations across time
Mentions: There remain many open challenges for advanced visualization for genome assemblies, alignments, polymorphisms, variations, synteny, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rearrangements and annotations [66, 67]. To better follow progress in the visualization field, we first need to follow the way in which new technologies, questions and trends have been shaped over the years (Fig. 3).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: "Α picture is worth a thousand words." This widely used adage sums up in a few words the notion that a successful visual representation of a concept should enable easy and rapid absorption of large amounts of information.We briefly comment on many visualization and analysis tools and the purposes that they serve.We focus on the latest libraries and programming languages that enable more effective, efficient and faster approaches for visualizing biological concepts, and also comment on the future human-computer interaction trends that would enable for enhancing visualization further.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Laboratory, Division of Basic Sciences, University of Crete, Medical School, 70013 Heraklion, Crete Greece.

ABSTRACT
"Α picture is worth a thousand words." This widely used adage sums up in a few words the notion that a successful visual representation of a concept should enable easy and rapid absorption of large amounts of information. Although, in general, the notion of capturing complex ideas using images is very appealing, would 1000 words be enough to describe the unknown in a research field such as the life sciences? Life sciences is one of the biggest generators of enormous datasets, mainly as a result of recent and rapid technological advances; their complexity can make these datasets incomprehensible without effective visualization methods. Here we discuss the past, present and future of genomic and systems biology visualization. We briefly comment on many visualization and analysis tools and the purposes that they serve. We focus on the latest libraries and programming languages that enable more effective, efficient and faster approaches for visualizing biological concepts, and also comment on the future human-computer interaction trends that would enable for enhancing visualization further.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus