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Analysis of the characteristics and prognosis of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in older patients.

Gao Y, Gao F, Ma JL, Zhang XZ, Li Y, Song LP, Zhao DL - Patient Prefer Adherence (2015)

Bottom Line: In the patients with adenocarcinoma, more cases were found in group II than that in group I; the more squamous cell carcinoma and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group (P<0.05).There was no significant difference between two groups statistically in survival by univariate analysis (P>0.05).More adenocarcinoma patients were found in youthful lung cancer and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. However, most elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been undertreated and the outcome related to age is controversial. A retrospective analysis was conducted for advanced NSCLC in order to investigate the characteristics and prognosis of older patients.

Methods: Medical records were collected from 165 patients with NSCLC (stages IIIA-IIIB) who had been treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or radiotherapy from January 2009 to January 2011. The cases were divided into two age groups 1) patients ≥70 years old; 2) patients <70 years old. There were 73 patients in group I, 92 in group II. Patient characteristics, treatment toxicities, and prognosis were evaluated.

Results: Of the 165 patients analyzed, 34 patients (34/73) in group I received concurrent CRT while 47 (47/92) in group II completed that treatment. No significant difference was observed in the reason for patients who discontinued CRT in two groups (P>0.05). In the patients with adenocarcinoma, more cases were found in group II than that in group I; the more squamous cell carcinoma and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group (P<0.05). With a median follow-up of 20.5 months, the 1-year survival for group I and II were 49.3% and 40.2% respectively (P=0.243). Two-year survival for the two groups was 20.5% and 16.3% (P=0.483); 3-year survival was 9.6% and 9.8% (P=0.967). There was no significant difference between two groups statistically in survival by univariate analysis (P>0.05). The therapy-related toxicities in group I seem to be similar to the group II (P>0.05).

Conclusion: More adenocarcinoma patients were found in youthful lung cancer and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group. Age is not the important factor for the selection and allocation of treatment in advanced NSCLC. The same prognosis and toxicities had been shown in older and young. Age may not be an independent increased risk of death in advanced NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Survival analysis in locally advanced lung cancer, stratified by groups I and II (P>0.05).
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f1-ppa-9-1189: Survival analysis in locally advanced lung cancer, stratified by groups I and II (P>0.05).

Mentions: With a median follow-up of 20.5 months, the 1-year survival for group I and II were 49.3% and 40.2% respectively (P=0.243). Two-year survival for the two groups was 20.5% and 16.3% (P=0.483); 3-year survival was 9.6% and 9.8% (P=0.967). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in survival as shown by univariate analysis (P>0.05) (Figure 1 and Table 2).


Analysis of the characteristics and prognosis of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in older patients.

Gao Y, Gao F, Ma JL, Zhang XZ, Li Y, Song LP, Zhao DL - Patient Prefer Adherence (2015)

Survival analysis in locally advanced lung cancer, stratified by groups I and II (P>0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548719&req=5

f1-ppa-9-1189: Survival analysis in locally advanced lung cancer, stratified by groups I and II (P>0.05).
Mentions: With a median follow-up of 20.5 months, the 1-year survival for group I and II were 49.3% and 40.2% respectively (P=0.243). Two-year survival for the two groups was 20.5% and 16.3% (P=0.483); 3-year survival was 9.6% and 9.8% (P=0.967). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in survival as shown by univariate analysis (P>0.05) (Figure 1 and Table 2).

Bottom Line: In the patients with adenocarcinoma, more cases were found in group II than that in group I; the more squamous cell carcinoma and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group (P<0.05).There was no significant difference between two groups statistically in survival by univariate analysis (P>0.05).More adenocarcinoma patients were found in youthful lung cancer and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. However, most elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been undertreated and the outcome related to age is controversial. A retrospective analysis was conducted for advanced NSCLC in order to investigate the characteristics and prognosis of older patients.

Methods: Medical records were collected from 165 patients with NSCLC (stages IIIA-IIIB) who had been treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or radiotherapy from January 2009 to January 2011. The cases were divided into two age groups 1) patients ≥70 years old; 2) patients <70 years old. There were 73 patients in group I, 92 in group II. Patient characteristics, treatment toxicities, and prognosis were evaluated.

Results: Of the 165 patients analyzed, 34 patients (34/73) in group I received concurrent CRT while 47 (47/92) in group II completed that treatment. No significant difference was observed in the reason for patients who discontinued CRT in two groups (P>0.05). In the patients with adenocarcinoma, more cases were found in group II than that in group I; the more squamous cell carcinoma and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group (P<0.05). With a median follow-up of 20.5 months, the 1-year survival for group I and II were 49.3% and 40.2% respectively (P=0.243). Two-year survival for the two groups was 20.5% and 16.3% (P=0.483); 3-year survival was 9.6% and 9.8% (P=0.967). There was no significant difference between two groups statistically in survival by univariate analysis (P>0.05). The therapy-related toxicities in group I seem to be similar to the group II (P>0.05).

Conclusion: More adenocarcinoma patients were found in youthful lung cancer and the more smokers with squamous cell carcinoma were seen in older group. Age is not the important factor for the selection and allocation of treatment in advanced NSCLC. The same prognosis and toxicities had been shown in older and young. Age may not be an independent increased risk of death in advanced NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus