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A Study of Phytolith-occluded Carbon Stock in Monopodial Bamboo in China.

Yang J, Wu J, Jiang P, Xu Q, Zhao P, He S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Bamboo plants have been proven to be rich in phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) and play an important role in reducing atmospheric concentrations of CO2.It can be concluded that it could be more accurate to estimate PhytOC stock or PhytOC production flux by basing on whole aboveground biomass rather than on leaf or leaf litter only.The whole biomass should be collected for more estimation of bamboo PhytOC sequestration capacity in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Carbon Cycling in Forest Ecosystems and Carbon Sequestration, Zhejiang A &F University, Lin'an 311300, China.

ABSTRACT
Bamboo plants have been proven to be rich in phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) and play an important role in reducing atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The object of this paper was to obtain more accurate methods for estimation of PhytOC stock in monopodial bamboo because previous studies may have underestimated it. Eight monopodial bamboo species, widely distributed across China, were selected and sampled for this study in their own typical distribution areas. There were differences (P < 0.05) both in phytolith content (Phytolith/dry biomass) across leaves, branches and culm, and in PhytOC content (PhytOC/dry biomass) across leaves and branches between species, with a trend of leaf > branch > culm. The average PhytOC stored in aboveground biomass and PhytOC production flux contributed by aboveground biomass varied substantially, and they were 3.28 and 1.57 times corresponding dates in leaves, with the highest in Phyllostachys glauca McClure and lowest in Indocalamus tessellatus (Munro) Keng f. It can be concluded that it could be more accurate to estimate PhytOC stock or PhytOC production flux by basing on whole aboveground biomass rather than on leaf or leaf litter only. The whole biomass should be collected for more estimation of bamboo PhytOC sequestration capacity in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of PhytOC stockpiled in different organs of 8 widely distributed bamboo species.Error bars are standard error (n = 4); different lowercase letters indicate significant differences among the bamboo species at P = 0.05 level based on the least significant difference (LSD) test.
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f2: Comparison of PhytOC stockpiled in different organs of 8 widely distributed bamboo species.Error bars are standard error (n = 4); different lowercase letters indicate significant differences among the bamboo species at P = 0.05 level based on the least significant difference (LSD) test.

Mentions: Both phytolith contents (Phytolith/dry biomass) and PhytOC contents (PhytOC/dry biomass) varied substantially in the leaf, branch and culm samples among the eight monopodial bamboo species (Fig. 1A,B). Differences between many species were statistically significant (p < 0.05) except for the PhytOC content in the culm. Both the phytolith and PhytOC contents showed the following trend: leaf > branch > culm. The leaf phytolith content was highest in the triennial Phyllostachys heteroclada Oliver (122 ± 4 g kg−1), and lowest in the triennial Pleioblastus amarus (Keng) Keng f. (37 ± 1 g kg−1) (Fig. 1A). The PhytOC content in leaves ranged from 2.7 ± 0.3 to 6.2 ± 0.3 g kg−1 with a mean of 4.3 g kg−1 (Fig. 1B). The PhytOC stock per ha was highest in the culm compared with the leaf and branch (Fig. 2), except for Pl. amarus, Phyllostachys prominens and Indocalamus tessellatus (Munro) Keng f. However, the amount of PhytOC stock per ha within the same organ varied among species and significant differences were observed between certain species (Fig. 2).


A Study of Phytolith-occluded Carbon Stock in Monopodial Bamboo in China.

Yang J, Wu J, Jiang P, Xu Q, Zhao P, He S - Sci Rep (2015)

Comparison of PhytOC stockpiled in different organs of 8 widely distributed bamboo species.Error bars are standard error (n = 4); different lowercase letters indicate significant differences among the bamboo species at P = 0.05 level based on the least significant difference (LSD) test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548440&req=5

f2: Comparison of PhytOC stockpiled in different organs of 8 widely distributed bamboo species.Error bars are standard error (n = 4); different lowercase letters indicate significant differences among the bamboo species at P = 0.05 level based on the least significant difference (LSD) test.
Mentions: Both phytolith contents (Phytolith/dry biomass) and PhytOC contents (PhytOC/dry biomass) varied substantially in the leaf, branch and culm samples among the eight monopodial bamboo species (Fig. 1A,B). Differences between many species were statistically significant (p < 0.05) except for the PhytOC content in the culm. Both the phytolith and PhytOC contents showed the following trend: leaf > branch > culm. The leaf phytolith content was highest in the triennial Phyllostachys heteroclada Oliver (122 ± 4 g kg−1), and lowest in the triennial Pleioblastus amarus (Keng) Keng f. (37 ± 1 g kg−1) (Fig. 1A). The PhytOC content in leaves ranged from 2.7 ± 0.3 to 6.2 ± 0.3 g kg−1 with a mean of 4.3 g kg−1 (Fig. 1B). The PhytOC stock per ha was highest in the culm compared with the leaf and branch (Fig. 2), except for Pl. amarus, Phyllostachys prominens and Indocalamus tessellatus (Munro) Keng f. However, the amount of PhytOC stock per ha within the same organ varied among species and significant differences were observed between certain species (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Bamboo plants have been proven to be rich in phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) and play an important role in reducing atmospheric concentrations of CO2.It can be concluded that it could be more accurate to estimate PhytOC stock or PhytOC production flux by basing on whole aboveground biomass rather than on leaf or leaf litter only.The whole biomass should be collected for more estimation of bamboo PhytOC sequestration capacity in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Carbon Cycling in Forest Ecosystems and Carbon Sequestration, Zhejiang A &F University, Lin'an 311300, China.

ABSTRACT
Bamboo plants have been proven to be rich in phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) and play an important role in reducing atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The object of this paper was to obtain more accurate methods for estimation of PhytOC stock in monopodial bamboo because previous studies may have underestimated it. Eight monopodial bamboo species, widely distributed across China, were selected and sampled for this study in their own typical distribution areas. There were differences (P < 0.05) both in phytolith content (Phytolith/dry biomass) across leaves, branches and culm, and in PhytOC content (PhytOC/dry biomass) across leaves and branches between species, with a trend of leaf > branch > culm. The average PhytOC stored in aboveground biomass and PhytOC production flux contributed by aboveground biomass varied substantially, and they were 3.28 and 1.57 times corresponding dates in leaves, with the highest in Phyllostachys glauca McClure and lowest in Indocalamus tessellatus (Munro) Keng f. It can be concluded that it could be more accurate to estimate PhytOC stock or PhytOC production flux by basing on whole aboveground biomass rather than on leaf or leaf litter only. The whole biomass should be collected for more estimation of bamboo PhytOC sequestration capacity in the future.

No MeSH data available.