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Differential response of kabuli and desi chickpea genotypes toward inoculation with PGPR in different soils.

Imran A, Mirza MS, Shah TM, Malik KA, Hafeez FY - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield.The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil.Furthermore, the study shows the potential of phytohormone producing strain Ca-34(T) as promising candidate for development of biofertilizer alongwith nodulating strains to get sustainable yield of kabuli and desi chickpea with minimum inputs at marginal land.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Faisalabad, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield. Soil fertility and inoculation with beneficial rhizobacteria play a key role in nodulation and yield of legumes. Four kabuli and six desi chickpea genotypes were, therefore, evaluated for inoculation response with IAA-producing Ochrobactrum ciceri Ca-34(T) and nitrogen fixing Mesorhizobium ciceri TAL-1148 in single and co-inoculation in two soils. The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil. The effect of soil fertility status was pronounced and fertile soil on average, produced 31% more nodules, 62% more biomass and 111% grain yield than marginal soil. Inoculation either with O. ciceri alone or its co-inoculation with M. ciceri produced on average higher nodules (42%), biomass (31%), grains yield (64%) and harvest index (72%) in both chickpea genotypes over non-inoculated controls in both soils. Soil 1 showed maximum relative effectiveness of Ca-34(T) inoculation for kabuli genotypes while soil 2 showed for desi genotypes except B8/02. Desi genotype B8/02 in soil type 1 and Pb-2008 in soil type 2 showed significant yield increase as compared to respective un-inoculated controls. Across bacterial inoculation treatments, grain yield was positively correlated to growth and yield contributing parameters (r = 0.294(*) to 0.838(***) for desi and r = 0.388(*) to 0.857(**) for kabuli). PCA and CAT-PCA analyses clearly showed a site-specific response of genotype x bacterial inoculation. Furthermore, the inoculated bacterial strains were able to persist in the rhizosphere showing colonization on root and within nodules. Present study shows that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation should be integrated with national chickpea breading program in Pakistan especially for marginal soils. Furthermore, the study shows the potential of phytohormone producing strain Ca-34(T) as promising candidate for development of biofertilizer alongwith nodulating strains to get sustainable yield of kabuli and desi chickpea with minimum inputs at marginal land.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of bacterial inoculation on nodulation of chickpea genotypes in different soils. The nodules induced after inoculation on kabuli genotype Pb-Noor-2009 in marginal (B–D) and fertile soil (J–L) as compared to respective non-inoculated control plants (A,I) and Desi genotype 93127 in marginal (F–H) and fertile soil (N–P) as compared to respective non-inoculated controls (E,M).
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Figure 1: Effect of bacterial inoculation on nodulation of chickpea genotypes in different soils. The nodules induced after inoculation on kabuli genotype Pb-Noor-2009 in marginal (B–D) and fertile soil (J–L) as compared to respective non-inoculated control plants (A,I) and Desi genotype 93127 in marginal (F–H) and fertile soil (N–P) as compared to respective non-inoculated controls (E,M).

Mentions: Nodulation exhibited no consistent pattern with plant genotype, inoculation or soil type. Nodules were mostly observed along entire primary/tap root in most of the genotypes forming crown (whorls) around the root and very few nodules were observed on secondary roots (Figure 1). Nodule number and nodule biomass showed differential genotype response toward inoculation in both soils (P < 0.05) and generally nodule number and biomass was higher in soil 2 (Table 3). Kabuli genotypes produced higher nodules and nodule biomass in unplanted soil than desi genotypes. Nodulation in kabuli genotypes Pb-Noor-2009, PKV-2 and desi genotypes Pb-2008, CH23/00 was significantly increased either by single inoculation with Ca-34T (up to 42%) or co-inoculated along-with TAL-1148 (up to 29%) in both soils. Inoculation with TAL-1148 alone however, had non-significant effect on nodulation of most of the kabuli and desi genotypes in any soil. Comparison of treatment means (averaged over genotypes and replicates) showed that in soil 1, nodulation in Ca-34T-inoculated plants was maximum (55.85 nodules per plant) followed by its co-inoculation (50.93 nodules per plant) while in soil 2, nodulation was maximum in co-inoculated plants (72.15 nodules per plant) followed by Ca-34T-inoculated plants (62.23 nodules per plant).


Differential response of kabuli and desi chickpea genotypes toward inoculation with PGPR in different soils.

Imran A, Mirza MS, Shah TM, Malik KA, Hafeez FY - Front Microbiol (2015)

Effect of bacterial inoculation on nodulation of chickpea genotypes in different soils. The nodules induced after inoculation on kabuli genotype Pb-Noor-2009 in marginal (B–D) and fertile soil (J–L) as compared to respective non-inoculated control plants (A,I) and Desi genotype 93127 in marginal (F–H) and fertile soil (N–P) as compared to respective non-inoculated controls (E,M).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548240&req=5

Figure 1: Effect of bacterial inoculation on nodulation of chickpea genotypes in different soils. The nodules induced after inoculation on kabuli genotype Pb-Noor-2009 in marginal (B–D) and fertile soil (J–L) as compared to respective non-inoculated control plants (A,I) and Desi genotype 93127 in marginal (F–H) and fertile soil (N–P) as compared to respective non-inoculated controls (E,M).
Mentions: Nodulation exhibited no consistent pattern with plant genotype, inoculation or soil type. Nodules were mostly observed along entire primary/tap root in most of the genotypes forming crown (whorls) around the root and very few nodules were observed on secondary roots (Figure 1). Nodule number and nodule biomass showed differential genotype response toward inoculation in both soils (P < 0.05) and generally nodule number and biomass was higher in soil 2 (Table 3). Kabuli genotypes produced higher nodules and nodule biomass in unplanted soil than desi genotypes. Nodulation in kabuli genotypes Pb-Noor-2009, PKV-2 and desi genotypes Pb-2008, CH23/00 was significantly increased either by single inoculation with Ca-34T (up to 42%) or co-inoculated along-with TAL-1148 (up to 29%) in both soils. Inoculation with TAL-1148 alone however, had non-significant effect on nodulation of most of the kabuli and desi genotypes in any soil. Comparison of treatment means (averaged over genotypes and replicates) showed that in soil 1, nodulation in Ca-34T-inoculated plants was maximum (55.85 nodules per plant) followed by its co-inoculation (50.93 nodules per plant) while in soil 2, nodulation was maximum in co-inoculated plants (72.15 nodules per plant) followed by Ca-34T-inoculated plants (62.23 nodules per plant).

Bottom Line: Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield.The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil.Furthermore, the study shows the potential of phytohormone producing strain Ca-34(T) as promising candidate for development of biofertilizer alongwith nodulating strains to get sustainable yield of kabuli and desi chickpea with minimum inputs at marginal land.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Faisalabad, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield. Soil fertility and inoculation with beneficial rhizobacteria play a key role in nodulation and yield of legumes. Four kabuli and six desi chickpea genotypes were, therefore, evaluated for inoculation response with IAA-producing Ochrobactrum ciceri Ca-34(T) and nitrogen fixing Mesorhizobium ciceri TAL-1148 in single and co-inoculation in two soils. The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil. The effect of soil fertility status was pronounced and fertile soil on average, produced 31% more nodules, 62% more biomass and 111% grain yield than marginal soil. Inoculation either with O. ciceri alone or its co-inoculation with M. ciceri produced on average higher nodules (42%), biomass (31%), grains yield (64%) and harvest index (72%) in both chickpea genotypes over non-inoculated controls in both soils. Soil 1 showed maximum relative effectiveness of Ca-34(T) inoculation for kabuli genotypes while soil 2 showed for desi genotypes except B8/02. Desi genotype B8/02 in soil type 1 and Pb-2008 in soil type 2 showed significant yield increase as compared to respective un-inoculated controls. Across bacterial inoculation treatments, grain yield was positively correlated to growth and yield contributing parameters (r = 0.294(*) to 0.838(***) for desi and r = 0.388(*) to 0.857(**) for kabuli). PCA and CAT-PCA analyses clearly showed a site-specific response of genotype x bacterial inoculation. Furthermore, the inoculated bacterial strains were able to persist in the rhizosphere showing colonization on root and within nodules. Present study shows that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation should be integrated with national chickpea breading program in Pakistan especially for marginal soils. Furthermore, the study shows the potential of phytohormone producing strain Ca-34(T) as promising candidate for development of biofertilizer alongwith nodulating strains to get sustainable yield of kabuli and desi chickpea with minimum inputs at marginal land.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus