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Controlling wave-vector of propagating surface plasmon polaritons on single-crystalline gold nanoplates.

Luo S, Yang H, Yang Y, Zhao D, Chen X, Qiu M, Li Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films.By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation.These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China.

ABSTRACT
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating at metal nanostructures play an important role in breaking the diffraction limit. Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films. The excitation and propagation of leaky SPPs on micrometer sized (10-20 μm) and thin (30 nm) gold nanoplates are investigated utilizing leakage radiation microscopy. By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation. These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimentally recorded Fourier images of hexagonal gold nanoplates.(a) The bright field image in the real image plane of the hexagonal gold nanoplate with labelled edges (1, 2 and 3). The red arrow represents the polarization of incident light. (b) The dark field images in the real image plane of SPP corner modes propagating along three labelled edges. (c) The Fourier image of propagating SPP modes in all different directions under the polarization state in (a). By adjusting the polarization of incident light, the Fourier images correspond to intensity peaks of the three propagation directions (kx1, kx2 and kx3) are shown in (d) to (f). By extracting the propagating leaky SPP corner mode in one direction (kx1, kx2 or kx3) in the real image plane, the corresponding Fourier images are shown in (g) to (i).
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f6: Experimentally recorded Fourier images of hexagonal gold nanoplates.(a) The bright field image in the real image plane of the hexagonal gold nanoplate with labelled edges (1, 2 and 3). The red arrow represents the polarization of incident light. (b) The dark field images in the real image plane of SPP corner modes propagating along three labelled edges. (c) The Fourier image of propagating SPP modes in all different directions under the polarization state in (a). By adjusting the polarization of incident light, the Fourier images correspond to intensity peaks of the three propagation directions (kx1, kx2 and kx3) are shown in (d) to (f). By extracting the propagating leaky SPP corner mode in one direction (kx1, kx2 or kx3) in the real image plane, the corresponding Fourier images are shown in (g) to (i).

Mentions: The propagating properties of leaky SPP corner modes on hexagonal nanoplates are further studied. As is shown in Fig. 6a, when the incident laser is focused on the apex of a hexagonal nanoplate, the excited SPPs propagate along the edges as well as the whole surface of the nanoplate. Figure 6b depicts three individual dark field images of SPP corner modes propagating along the labelled edges in the real image plane. However, due to superposition and interference of propagating SPPs in all different directions, it is too ambiguous and complicated to identify the wave-vectors of the SPP modes propagating along the edges, as is shown in Fig. 6c.


Controlling wave-vector of propagating surface plasmon polaritons on single-crystalline gold nanoplates.

Luo S, Yang H, Yang Y, Zhao D, Chen X, Qiu M, Li Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Experimentally recorded Fourier images of hexagonal gold nanoplates.(a) The bright field image in the real image plane of the hexagonal gold nanoplate with labelled edges (1, 2 and 3). The red arrow represents the polarization of incident light. (b) The dark field images in the real image plane of SPP corner modes propagating along three labelled edges. (c) The Fourier image of propagating SPP modes in all different directions under the polarization state in (a). By adjusting the polarization of incident light, the Fourier images correspond to intensity peaks of the three propagation directions (kx1, kx2 and kx3) are shown in (d) to (f). By extracting the propagating leaky SPP corner mode in one direction (kx1, kx2 or kx3) in the real image plane, the corresponding Fourier images are shown in (g) to (i).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548230&req=5

f6: Experimentally recorded Fourier images of hexagonal gold nanoplates.(a) The bright field image in the real image plane of the hexagonal gold nanoplate with labelled edges (1, 2 and 3). The red arrow represents the polarization of incident light. (b) The dark field images in the real image plane of SPP corner modes propagating along three labelled edges. (c) The Fourier image of propagating SPP modes in all different directions under the polarization state in (a). By adjusting the polarization of incident light, the Fourier images correspond to intensity peaks of the three propagation directions (kx1, kx2 and kx3) are shown in (d) to (f). By extracting the propagating leaky SPP corner mode in one direction (kx1, kx2 or kx3) in the real image plane, the corresponding Fourier images are shown in (g) to (i).
Mentions: The propagating properties of leaky SPP corner modes on hexagonal nanoplates are further studied. As is shown in Fig. 6a, when the incident laser is focused on the apex of a hexagonal nanoplate, the excited SPPs propagate along the edges as well as the whole surface of the nanoplate. Figure 6b depicts three individual dark field images of SPP corner modes propagating along the labelled edges in the real image plane. However, due to superposition and interference of propagating SPPs in all different directions, it is too ambiguous and complicated to identify the wave-vectors of the SPP modes propagating along the edges, as is shown in Fig. 6c.

Bottom Line: Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films.By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation.These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China.

ABSTRACT
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating at metal nanostructures play an important role in breaking the diffraction limit. Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films. The excitation and propagation of leaky SPPs on micrometer sized (10-20 μm) and thin (30 nm) gold nanoplates are investigated utilizing leakage radiation microscopy. By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation. These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus