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Controlling wave-vector of propagating surface plasmon polaritons on single-crystalline gold nanoplates.

Luo S, Yang H, Yang Y, Zhao D, Chen X, Qiu M, Li Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films.By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation.These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China.

ABSTRACT
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating at metal nanostructures play an important role in breaking the diffraction limit. Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films. The excitation and propagation of leaky SPPs on micrometer sized (10-20 μm) and thin (30 nm) gold nanoplates are investigated utilizing leakage radiation microscopy. By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation. These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Typical optical microscope image of gold nanoplates. (b) and (c) are SEM images of triangular and hexagonal nanoplate, respectively. The images are taken with 54° tilting angles for the sample stage.
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f1: (a) Typical optical microscope image of gold nanoplates. (b) and (c) are SEM images of triangular and hexagonal nanoplate, respectively. The images are taken with 54° tilting angles for the sample stage.

Mentions: The growth of gold nanoplates used in experiments is achieved following the chemical synthesis procedure described in previous reports2834. The gold nanoplates are washed with anhydrous ethanol several times and dispersed on an indium tin oxide coated cover glass substrate (n = 1.52). Figure 1 shows a typical optical microscopy image and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of nanoplates including shapes of both equilateral triangle and hexagon. The area of nanoplates can reach about 300 μm2 and nanoplates with an edge length of tens of micrometres are chosen in experiments to investigate the propagating SPPs. The thickness of nanoplates used in experiments is around 30 nm, thus supporting leaky radiation of propagating SPPs into the substrate.


Controlling wave-vector of propagating surface plasmon polaritons on single-crystalline gold nanoplates.

Luo S, Yang H, Yang Y, Zhao D, Chen X, Qiu M, Li Q - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) Typical optical microscope image of gold nanoplates. (b) and (c) are SEM images of triangular and hexagonal nanoplate, respectively. The images are taken with 54° tilting angles for the sample stage.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548230&req=5

f1: (a) Typical optical microscope image of gold nanoplates. (b) and (c) are SEM images of triangular and hexagonal nanoplate, respectively. The images are taken with 54° tilting angles for the sample stage.
Mentions: The growth of gold nanoplates used in experiments is achieved following the chemical synthesis procedure described in previous reports2834. The gold nanoplates are washed with anhydrous ethanol several times and dispersed on an indium tin oxide coated cover glass substrate (n = 1.52). Figure 1 shows a typical optical microscopy image and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of nanoplates including shapes of both equilateral triangle and hexagon. The area of nanoplates can reach about 300 μm2 and nanoplates with an edge length of tens of micrometres are chosen in experiments to investigate the propagating SPPs. The thickness of nanoplates used in experiments is around 30 nm, thus supporting leaky radiation of propagating SPPs into the substrate.

Bottom Line: Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films.By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation.These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China.

ABSTRACT
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating at metal nanostructures play an important role in breaking the diffraction limit. Chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates with atomically flat surfaces provide favorable features compared with traditional polycrystalline metal films. The excitation and propagation of leaky SPPs on micrometer sized (10-20 μm) and thin (30 nm) gold nanoplates are investigated utilizing leakage radiation microscopy. By varying polarization and excitation positions of incident light on apexes of nanoplates, wave-vector (including propagation constant and propagation direction) distributions of leaky SPPs in Fourier planes can be controlled, indicating tunable SPP propagation. These results hold promise for potential development of chemically synthesized single-crystalline metal nanoplates as plasmonic platforms in future applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus