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Changes in voiding behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

Biallosterski BT, Prickaerts J, Rahnama'i MS, de Wachter S, van Koeveringe GA, Meriaux C - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Anxiety-related behavior and locomotion were respectively tested in an elevated zero maze (EZM) and an open field (OF).The total volume of markings was significantly lower in the APP/PS1 mice.In both groups, the average volume of a marking in the corner zone was larger than in the center zone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University Hospital Maastricht Maastricht, Netherlands ; Department of Neuro-Urology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University Maastricht, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Besides cognitive decline and behavioral alteration, urinary incontinence often occurs in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD). To determine whether the transgenic mouse model of AD, APP/PS1 (APP(SL)/PS1(M146L)) mouse, shows alteration of the urinary bladder function and anxiety, as for patients with AD, we examined the urinary marking behavior in relation to affective behavior. At 18 months of age voiding behavior of APP/PS1 and wild type (WT) mice was assessed by using a modified filter paper assay in combination with video tracing, with the cage divided into a center and corner zones. Anxiety-related behavior and locomotion were respectively tested in an elevated zero maze (EZM) and an open field (OF). The APP/PS1 mice urinated more in the center zone than the WT mice. The total volume of markings was significantly lower in the APP/PS1 mice. In both groups, the average volume of a marking in the corner zone was larger than in the center zone. In the EZM, the APP/PS1 mice spent less time in the open arms of the arena, considered as anxiogenic zones, than the WT mice. During the OF task, the APP/PS1 mice covered a longer distance than the WT mice. These findings show that the APP/PS1 mice have a different voiding behavior compared to the WT mice, i.e., urinating with small volumes and voiding in the center of the cage, and suggest that increased locomotor activity and anxiety-related behaviors are factors in the change in voiding pattern in the APP/PS1 mouse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Elevated zero maze (EZM) and open field (OF) tasks. (A) The time spent (in s) in the open arms of the EZM. The WT group spends significantly more time in the open arms of the arena (#p < 0.05). (B) The mean total distance moved (in cm) in the OF. The APP/PS1 mice moved more than the WT mice. WT n = 9 and APP/PS1 n = 7. Data represent means ± SEM (##p < 0.01).
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Figure 6: Elevated zero maze (EZM) and open field (OF) tasks. (A) The time spent (in s) in the open arms of the EZM. The WT group spends significantly more time in the open arms of the arena (#p < 0.05). (B) The mean total distance moved (in cm) in the OF. The APP/PS1 mice moved more than the WT mice. WT n = 9 and APP/PS1 n = 7. Data represent means ± SEM (##p < 0.01).

Mentions: Anxiety related behavior was examined in the EZM task. This task was conducted one day after the VBT. Data were expressed as time spent in the open arms. Significant differences were found between the groups in the time spent in the open arms. The WT mice spent significantly more time in the open arms of the arena compared to the APP/PS1 mice (p = 0.012, Figure 6A).


Changes in voiding behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

Biallosterski BT, Prickaerts J, Rahnama'i MS, de Wachter S, van Koeveringe GA, Meriaux C - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Elevated zero maze (EZM) and open field (OF) tasks. (A) The time spent (in s) in the open arms of the EZM. The WT group spends significantly more time in the open arms of the arena (#p < 0.05). (B) The mean total distance moved (in cm) in the OF. The APP/PS1 mice moved more than the WT mice. WT n = 9 and APP/PS1 n = 7. Data represent means ± SEM (##p < 0.01).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548184&req=5

Figure 6: Elevated zero maze (EZM) and open field (OF) tasks. (A) The time spent (in s) in the open arms of the EZM. The WT group spends significantly more time in the open arms of the arena (#p < 0.05). (B) The mean total distance moved (in cm) in the OF. The APP/PS1 mice moved more than the WT mice. WT n = 9 and APP/PS1 n = 7. Data represent means ± SEM (##p < 0.01).
Mentions: Anxiety related behavior was examined in the EZM task. This task was conducted one day after the VBT. Data were expressed as time spent in the open arms. Significant differences were found between the groups in the time spent in the open arms. The WT mice spent significantly more time in the open arms of the arena compared to the APP/PS1 mice (p = 0.012, Figure 6A).

Bottom Line: Anxiety-related behavior and locomotion were respectively tested in an elevated zero maze (EZM) and an open field (OF).The total volume of markings was significantly lower in the APP/PS1 mice.In both groups, the average volume of a marking in the corner zone was larger than in the center zone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University Hospital Maastricht Maastricht, Netherlands ; Department of Neuro-Urology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University Maastricht, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Besides cognitive decline and behavioral alteration, urinary incontinence often occurs in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD). To determine whether the transgenic mouse model of AD, APP/PS1 (APP(SL)/PS1(M146L)) mouse, shows alteration of the urinary bladder function and anxiety, as for patients with AD, we examined the urinary marking behavior in relation to affective behavior. At 18 months of age voiding behavior of APP/PS1 and wild type (WT) mice was assessed by using a modified filter paper assay in combination with video tracing, with the cage divided into a center and corner zones. Anxiety-related behavior and locomotion were respectively tested in an elevated zero maze (EZM) and an open field (OF). The APP/PS1 mice urinated more in the center zone than the WT mice. The total volume of markings was significantly lower in the APP/PS1 mice. In both groups, the average volume of a marking in the corner zone was larger than in the center zone. In the EZM, the APP/PS1 mice spent less time in the open arms of the arena, considered as anxiogenic zones, than the WT mice. During the OF task, the APP/PS1 mice covered a longer distance than the WT mice. These findings show that the APP/PS1 mice have a different voiding behavior compared to the WT mice, i.e., urinating with small volumes and voiding in the center of the cage, and suggest that increased locomotor activity and anxiety-related behaviors are factors in the change in voiding pattern in the APP/PS1 mouse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus