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Analysis of the pathogenic potential of nosocomial Pseudomonas putida strains.

Fernández M, Porcel M, de la Torre J, Molina-Henares MA, Daddaoua A, Llamas MA, Roca A, Carriel V, Garzón I, Ramos JL, Alaminos M, Duque E - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study we describe the multilocus sequence typing of four P. putida strains (HB13667, HB8234, HB4184, and HB3267) isolated from in-patients at the Besançon Hospital (France).The four isolates (in particular HB3267) were resistant to a number of antibiotics.The putative evolution of these strains in medical environments is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Protection, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Granada, Spain ; Bio-Iliberis R&D Granada, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have also been reported as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing nosocomial infections. In this study we describe the multilocus sequence typing of four P. putida strains (HB13667, HB8234, HB4184, and HB3267) isolated from in-patients at the Besançon Hospital (France). The four isolates (in particular HB3267) were resistant to a number of antibiotics. The pathogenicity and virulence potential of the strains was tested ex vivo and in vivo using different biological models: human tissue culture, mammalian tissues, and insect larvae. Our results showed a significant variability in the ability of the four strains to damage the host; HB13667 did not exhibit any pathogenic traits, HB4184 caused damage only ex vivo in human tissue cultures, and HB8234 had a deleterious effect in tissue culture and in vivo on rat skin, but not in insect larvae. Interestingly, strain HB3267 caused damage in all the model systems studied. The putative evolution of these strains in medical environments is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree. Multi-way DNA alignment of the concatenated housekeeping gene sequences.
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Figure 1: Phylogenetic tree. Multi-way DNA alignment of the concatenated housekeeping gene sequences.

Mentions: After analyzing the sequences by Local Comparison using the Clone Manager Suite 7 program, the results allowed us to establish five allelic types and a three-branch phylogenetic tree (Figure 1). Four of the isolates belonged to the same allelic type: HB4477, HB4557, HB3536, and HB3267; all of them also harbored a 80 kb megaplasmid and exhibited a similar antibiotic resistance profile (see below), this data suggests that they represent different isolates of the same strain, we therefore randomly chose HB3267 as a representative of this group. Although HB13667 was phylogenetically close to the HB3267 group, the absence of the megaplasmid in this strain and a different antibiogram (see below) led us to consider it independently. HB4184, isolated from a CF patient, was dissimilar enough to be considered a different subgroup. HB8234 and HB3304 were found to be phylogenetically very similar when compared to the other clones; HB3304 was omitted from further analysis because we had already chosen a CF patient isolate. In summary and based on the above set of results, we chose HB13667, HB8234, HB4184, and HB3267 as representatives of the respective subgroups for further analysis.


Analysis of the pathogenic potential of nosocomial Pseudomonas putida strains.

Fernández M, Porcel M, de la Torre J, Molina-Henares MA, Daddaoua A, Llamas MA, Roca A, Carriel V, Garzón I, Ramos JL, Alaminos M, Duque E - Front Microbiol (2015)

Phylogenetic tree. Multi-way DNA alignment of the concatenated housekeeping gene sequences.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548156&req=5

Figure 1: Phylogenetic tree. Multi-way DNA alignment of the concatenated housekeeping gene sequences.
Mentions: After analyzing the sequences by Local Comparison using the Clone Manager Suite 7 program, the results allowed us to establish five allelic types and a three-branch phylogenetic tree (Figure 1). Four of the isolates belonged to the same allelic type: HB4477, HB4557, HB3536, and HB3267; all of them also harbored a 80 kb megaplasmid and exhibited a similar antibiotic resistance profile (see below), this data suggests that they represent different isolates of the same strain, we therefore randomly chose HB3267 as a representative of this group. Although HB13667 was phylogenetically close to the HB3267 group, the absence of the megaplasmid in this strain and a different antibiogram (see below) led us to consider it independently. HB4184, isolated from a CF patient, was dissimilar enough to be considered a different subgroup. HB8234 and HB3304 were found to be phylogenetically very similar when compared to the other clones; HB3304 was omitted from further analysis because we had already chosen a CF patient isolate. In summary and based on the above set of results, we chose HB13667, HB8234, HB4184, and HB3267 as representatives of the respective subgroups for further analysis.

Bottom Line: In this study we describe the multilocus sequence typing of four P. putida strains (HB13667, HB8234, HB4184, and HB3267) isolated from in-patients at the Besançon Hospital (France).The four isolates (in particular HB3267) were resistant to a number of antibiotics.The putative evolution of these strains in medical environments is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Protection, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Granada, Spain ; Bio-Iliberis R&D Granada, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have also been reported as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing nosocomial infections. In this study we describe the multilocus sequence typing of four P. putida strains (HB13667, HB8234, HB4184, and HB3267) isolated from in-patients at the Besançon Hospital (France). The four isolates (in particular HB3267) were resistant to a number of antibiotics. The pathogenicity and virulence potential of the strains was tested ex vivo and in vivo using different biological models: human tissue culture, mammalian tissues, and insect larvae. Our results showed a significant variability in the ability of the four strains to damage the host; HB13667 did not exhibit any pathogenic traits, HB4184 caused damage only ex vivo in human tissue cultures, and HB8234 had a deleterious effect in tissue culture and in vivo on rat skin, but not in insect larvae. Interestingly, strain HB3267 caused damage in all the model systems studied. The putative evolution of these strains in medical environments is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus