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Robot Comedy Lab: experimenting with the social dynamics of live performance.

Katevas K, Healey PG, Harris MT - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Using a life-size humanoid robot, programmed to perform a stand-up comedy routine, we manipulated the robot's patterns of gesture and gaze and examined their effects on the real-time responses of a live audience.The results highlight the complex, reciprocal social dynamics of performer and audience behavior.This work provides insights into how to design more effective, more socially engaging forms of robot interaction that can be used in a variety of service contexts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Science Research Group, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
The success of live comedy depends on a performer's ability to "work" an audience. Ethnographic studies suggest that this involves the co-ordinated use of subtle social signals such as body orientation, gesture, gaze by both performers and audience members. Robots provide a unique opportunity to test the effects of these signals experimentally. Using a life-size humanoid robot, programmed to perform a stand-up comedy routine, we manipulated the robot's patterns of gesture and gaze and examined their effects on the real-time responses of a live audience. The strength and type of responses were captured using SHORE™computer vision analytics. The results highlight the complex, reciprocal social dynamics of performer and audience behavior. People respond more positively when the robot looks at them, negatively when it looks away and performative gestures also contribute to different patterns of audience response. This demonstrates how the responses of individual audience members depend on the specific interaction they're having with the performer. This work provides insights into how to design more effective, more socially engaging forms of robot interaction that can be used in a variety of service contexts.

No MeSH data available.


Performative Gestures used during the live performance. (A) “Welcome” gesture, (B) Reprise “I said hello” gesture, (C) Pointing gesture, (D) Applause elicitation gesture.
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Figure 4: Performative Gestures used during the live performance. (A) “Welcome” gesture, (B) Reprise “I said hello” gesture, (C) Pointing gesture, (D) Applause elicitation gesture.

Mentions: During each performance, RoboThespian™ used four specific performative gestures. Due to timing issues, the first “welcome” gesture (Figure 4A) was not obvious to the participants as they were still applauding, welcoming RoboThespian™ on stage. Consequently this gesture is excluded from the analysis. The following three gestures are analyzed:


Robot Comedy Lab: experimenting with the social dynamics of live performance.

Katevas K, Healey PG, Harris MT - Front Psychol (2015)

Performative Gestures used during the live performance. (A) “Welcome” gesture, (B) Reprise “I said hello” gesture, (C) Pointing gesture, (D) Applause elicitation gesture.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4548079&req=5

Figure 4: Performative Gestures used during the live performance. (A) “Welcome” gesture, (B) Reprise “I said hello” gesture, (C) Pointing gesture, (D) Applause elicitation gesture.
Mentions: During each performance, RoboThespian™ used four specific performative gestures. Due to timing issues, the first “welcome” gesture (Figure 4A) was not obvious to the participants as they were still applauding, welcoming RoboThespian™ on stage. Consequently this gesture is excluded from the analysis. The following three gestures are analyzed:

Bottom Line: Using a life-size humanoid robot, programmed to perform a stand-up comedy routine, we manipulated the robot's patterns of gesture and gaze and examined their effects on the real-time responses of a live audience.The results highlight the complex, reciprocal social dynamics of performer and audience behavior.This work provides insights into how to design more effective, more socially engaging forms of robot interaction that can be used in a variety of service contexts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Science Research Group, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
The success of live comedy depends on a performer's ability to "work" an audience. Ethnographic studies suggest that this involves the co-ordinated use of subtle social signals such as body orientation, gesture, gaze by both performers and audience members. Robots provide a unique opportunity to test the effects of these signals experimentally. Using a life-size humanoid robot, programmed to perform a stand-up comedy routine, we manipulated the robot's patterns of gesture and gaze and examined their effects on the real-time responses of a live audience. The strength and type of responses were captured using SHORE™computer vision analytics. The results highlight the complex, reciprocal social dynamics of performer and audience behavior. People respond more positively when the robot looks at them, negatively when it looks away and performative gestures also contribute to different patterns of audience response. This demonstrates how the responses of individual audience members depend on the specific interaction they're having with the performer. This work provides insights into how to design more effective, more socially engaging forms of robot interaction that can be used in a variety of service contexts.

No MeSH data available.