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Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

Gomes EL, Carvalho CR, Peixoto-Souza FS, Teixeira-Carvalho EF, Mendonça JF, Stirbulov R, Sampaio LM, Costa D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function.No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline.Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma.

Design: A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function.

Results: No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG.

Conclusion: The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of the study (in compliance with the CONSORT statement).
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pone.0135433.g001: Flowchart of the study (in compliance with the CONSORT statement).

Mentions: The participants were selected based on the eligibility criteria and randomly allocated to either the VGG (n = 20) or TG (n = 16). Before and after the training protocols, the participants answered questions on asthma control and were submitted to the FeNO, maximum exercise, tetrapolar bioimpedance and lung function tests. The children were submitted to all the assessments during the first week and began the training protocols the following week. The training period lasted eight weeks and involved two weekly 40-minute sessions (5 minutes of warming up, 30 minutes of training and 5 minutes of cooling down). Fig 1. Flowchart of the study.


Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

Gomes EL, Carvalho CR, Peixoto-Souza FS, Teixeira-Carvalho EF, Mendonça JF, Stirbulov R, Sampaio LM, Costa D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flowchart of the study (in compliance with the CONSORT statement).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4547724&req=5

pone.0135433.g001: Flowchart of the study (in compliance with the CONSORT statement).
Mentions: The participants were selected based on the eligibility criteria and randomly allocated to either the VGG (n = 20) or TG (n = 16). Before and after the training protocols, the participants answered questions on asthma control and were submitted to the FeNO, maximum exercise, tetrapolar bioimpedance and lung function tests. The children were submitted to all the assessments during the first week and began the training protocols the following week. The training period lasted eight weeks and involved two weekly 40-minute sessions (5 minutes of warming up, 30 minutes of training and 5 minutes of cooling down). Fig 1. Flowchart of the study.

Bottom Line: Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function.No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline.Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma.

Design: A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function.

Results: No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG.

Conclusion: The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus