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Update on epidemiology of canine babesiosis in Southern France.

René-Martellet M, Moro CV, Chêne J, Bourdoiseau G, Chabanne L, Mavingui P - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: B. canis was the only species detected in D. reticulatus ticks (9.7 %).B. canis infections were only recorded in the southwest of France whereas B. vogeli was mainly found in the southeast.Further studies focusing on genetic and microbiota of R. sanguineus ticks should be conducted to explore other biological interactions that may explain the differences observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université de Lyon, VetAgro Sup, Jeune équipe Hémopathogènes vectorisés, Marcy l'Etoile, France. magalie.renemartellet@vetagro-sup.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Canine babesiosis is an emerging or re-emerging disease caused by Babesia and Theileria protozoans, also called piroplasms, transmitted by Ixodid ticks. In Europe, four etiological agents have been identified to date, namely Babesia canis, B. vogeli, B. gibsoni and Theileria annae. France has a high prevalence of canine babesiosis and two tick species, Dermacentor reticulatus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus, are supposed to transmit B. canis and B. vogeli respectively. In southern France, where dog infections with B. vogeli were recently confirmed, no comprehensive study was performed to date on piroplasm species infecting dogs. Thus, a large scale survey involving veterinary clinics, kennels and tick collection from the environment was conducted from 2010 to 2012 in this area.

Results: From 2010 to 2012, 140 dog blood samples and 667 ticks were collected. All blood and a subset of ticks were screened for the presence of piroplasms by PCR amplification of 18S rDNA. B. vogeli, B. canis and T. annae were detected in 13.6, 12.9 and 0.7 % dogs respectively. B. vogeli and B. canis were detected in 10.5 % and in 1.6 % R. sanguineus ticks including 1.3 % co-infections. B. canis was the only species detected in D. reticulatus ticks (9.7 %). B. canis infections were only recorded in the southwest of France whereas B. vogeli was mainly found in the southeast. Finally, a significantly higher prevalence of B. vogeli infection was found in Gard compared to Corsica and Drôme regions, both in dogs (p < 0.002) and R. sanguineus ticks (p < 0.02) although R. sanguineus was the main ticks species removed from dogs in those three areas.

Conclusions: The survey confirmed the circulation of both B. canis and B. vogeli in dogs in southern France with differences in distribution probably linked to the distribution of their respective vectors. It also showed differences in prevalence of B. vogeli infection in areas similar in terms of risk of dogs infestation with R. sanguineus. Further studies focusing on genetic and microbiota of R. sanguineus ticks should be conducted to explore other biological interactions that may explain the differences observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PCR-RFLP profiles of 18S rRNA gene fragments from selected piroplasm species. This method was used to discriminate between Babesia/Theileria species from ticks or blood samples known to contain piroplasms following nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Lanes 2 to 8 and lanes 10 to 16 show PCR-RFLP products for seven piroplasm species known or supposed to infect dogs in France and in Europe digested with endonucleases TaqI or HinfI, respectively. Lanes 1, 9 and 17 show 100-bp molecular weight markers. Product sizes expected for each piroplasm species after digestion with TaqI or HinfI enzymes are given in the table
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Fig2: PCR-RFLP profiles of 18S rRNA gene fragments from selected piroplasm species. This method was used to discriminate between Babesia/Theileria species from ticks or blood samples known to contain piroplasms following nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Lanes 2 to 8 and lanes 10 to 16 show PCR-RFLP products for seven piroplasm species known or supposed to infect dogs in France and in Europe digested with endonucleases TaqI or HinfI, respectively. Lanes 1, 9 and 17 show 100-bp molecular weight markers. Product sizes expected for each piroplasm species after digestion with TaqI or HinfI enzymes are given in the table

Mentions: A nested PCR-RFLP method was tested with the seven piroplasm species detected to date in dog blood samples in Europe (Fig. 2). This method confirmed its ability to discriminate the seven Babesia/Theileria species tested. Its accuracy for detection of Babesia/Theileria species in dog blood samples as well as in tick samples was established since no inappropriate bands were observed. Consequently, this method was used to screen for piroplasms in dog blood samples and ticks.Fig. 2


Update on epidemiology of canine babesiosis in Southern France.

René-Martellet M, Moro CV, Chêne J, Bourdoiseau G, Chabanne L, Mavingui P - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

PCR-RFLP profiles of 18S rRNA gene fragments from selected piroplasm species. This method was used to discriminate between Babesia/Theileria species from ticks or blood samples known to contain piroplasms following nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Lanes 2 to 8 and lanes 10 to 16 show PCR-RFLP products for seven piroplasm species known or supposed to infect dogs in France and in Europe digested with endonucleases TaqI or HinfI, respectively. Lanes 1, 9 and 17 show 100-bp molecular weight markers. Product sizes expected for each piroplasm species after digestion with TaqI or HinfI enzymes are given in the table
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4547427&req=5

Fig2: PCR-RFLP profiles of 18S rRNA gene fragments from selected piroplasm species. This method was used to discriminate between Babesia/Theileria species from ticks or blood samples known to contain piroplasms following nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Lanes 2 to 8 and lanes 10 to 16 show PCR-RFLP products for seven piroplasm species known or supposed to infect dogs in France and in Europe digested with endonucleases TaqI or HinfI, respectively. Lanes 1, 9 and 17 show 100-bp molecular weight markers. Product sizes expected for each piroplasm species after digestion with TaqI or HinfI enzymes are given in the table
Mentions: A nested PCR-RFLP method was tested with the seven piroplasm species detected to date in dog blood samples in Europe (Fig. 2). This method confirmed its ability to discriminate the seven Babesia/Theileria species tested. Its accuracy for detection of Babesia/Theileria species in dog blood samples as well as in tick samples was established since no inappropriate bands were observed. Consequently, this method was used to screen for piroplasms in dog blood samples and ticks.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: B. canis was the only species detected in D. reticulatus ticks (9.7 %).B. canis infections were only recorded in the southwest of France whereas B. vogeli was mainly found in the southeast.Further studies focusing on genetic and microbiota of R. sanguineus ticks should be conducted to explore other biological interactions that may explain the differences observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université de Lyon, VetAgro Sup, Jeune équipe Hémopathogènes vectorisés, Marcy l'Etoile, France. magalie.renemartellet@vetagro-sup.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Canine babesiosis is an emerging or re-emerging disease caused by Babesia and Theileria protozoans, also called piroplasms, transmitted by Ixodid ticks. In Europe, four etiological agents have been identified to date, namely Babesia canis, B. vogeli, B. gibsoni and Theileria annae. France has a high prevalence of canine babesiosis and two tick species, Dermacentor reticulatus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus, are supposed to transmit B. canis and B. vogeli respectively. In southern France, where dog infections with B. vogeli were recently confirmed, no comprehensive study was performed to date on piroplasm species infecting dogs. Thus, a large scale survey involving veterinary clinics, kennels and tick collection from the environment was conducted from 2010 to 2012 in this area.

Results: From 2010 to 2012, 140 dog blood samples and 667 ticks were collected. All blood and a subset of ticks were screened for the presence of piroplasms by PCR amplification of 18S rDNA. B. vogeli, B. canis and T. annae were detected in 13.6, 12.9 and 0.7 % dogs respectively. B. vogeli and B. canis were detected in 10.5 % and in 1.6 % R. sanguineus ticks including 1.3 % co-infections. B. canis was the only species detected in D. reticulatus ticks (9.7 %). B. canis infections were only recorded in the southwest of France whereas B. vogeli was mainly found in the southeast. Finally, a significantly higher prevalence of B. vogeli infection was found in Gard compared to Corsica and Drôme regions, both in dogs (p < 0.002) and R. sanguineus ticks (p < 0.02) although R. sanguineus was the main ticks species removed from dogs in those three areas.

Conclusions: The survey confirmed the circulation of both B. canis and B. vogeli in dogs in southern France with differences in distribution probably linked to the distribution of their respective vectors. It also showed differences in prevalence of B. vogeli infection in areas similar in terms of risk of dogs infestation with R. sanguineus. Further studies focusing on genetic and microbiota of R. sanguineus ticks should be conducted to explore other biological interactions that may explain the differences observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus