Limits...
Monograph of Coccinia (Cucurbitaceae).

Holstein N - PhytoKeys (2015)

Bottom Line: Chromosome numbers are 2n = 20, 24, and 22 + XX/XY.Many Coccinia species are used for food, either as roasted tubers, greens as spinach, or the fruits as vegetables.Medicinal value is established in Cocciniagrandis, of which leaves and sap are used against diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nees-Institute for Biodiversity of Plants, Meckenheimer Allee 170, 53115 Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This monograph deals with all 95 names described in the Cucurbitaceae genus Coccinia and recognizes 25 species. Taxonomic novelties are Cocciniaadoensisvar.aurantiaca (C.Jeffrey) Holstein, stat. nov., Cocciniasessilifoliavar.variifolia (A.Meeuse) Holstein, stat. nov., and Cocciniaadoensisvar.jeffreyana Holstein, var. nov. For the 25 species 3157 collections were examined, of which 2024 were georeferenced to produce distribution maps. All species are distributed in sub-Saharan Africa with one species, Cocciniagrandis, extending from Senegal in West Africa east to Indonesia and being naturalized on Pacific Islands, in Australia, the Caribbean, and South America. Coccinia species are dioecious creepers or climbers with simple or bifid tendrils that occupy a range of habitats from arid scrubland, woodlands to lowland rainforest and mist forest. The corolla of Coccinia species is sympetalous, usually pale yellow to orange, and 1 to 4.5 cm long. Pollination is by bees foraging for pollen or nectar. After pollination, the developing ovary often exhibits longitudinal mottling, which usually disappears during maturation. All species produce berries with a pericarp in reddish colors (orange-red through to scarlet red), hence the generic name. The globose to cylindrical fruits contain numerous grayish-beige flat to lenticular seeds. Chromosome numbers are 2n = 20, 24, and 22 + XX/XY. Many Coccinia species are used for food, either as roasted tubers, greens as spinach, or the fruits as vegetables. Medicinal value is established in Cocciniagrandis, of which leaves and sap are used against diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Young plant of Cocciniaabyssinica (N. Holstein 132). The first node is in the axilla where the glabrous cotyledons split off. The first nodes lack probracts and tendrils b Young plant of Cocciniasessilifolia (N. Holstein 131). The first leaves in this species are petiolate, sessile leaves are produced later-on. The glabrous cotyledons are already dried (plant had the same age as the one in Fig. 4a).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4547038&req=5

Figure 4: a Young plant of Cocciniaabyssinica (N. Holstein 132). The first node is in the axilla where the glabrous cotyledons split off. The first nodes lack probracts and tendrils b Young plant of Cocciniasessilifolia (N. Holstein 131). The first leaves in this species are petiolate, sessile leaves are produced later-on. The glabrous cotyledons are already dried (plant had the same age as the one in Fig. 4a).

Mentions: Zimmermann (1922b) reports epigeous cotyledons for Cocciniagrandiflora and Cocciniagrandis, of which the latter is confirmed by personal observations (Fig. 1a). Epigeous cotyledons also occur in Cocciniaabyssinica, Cocciniaadoensisvar.jeffreyana, Cocciniamicrophylla, Cocciniarehmanniiaff. var.littoralis, and Cocciniasessilifolia. The hypocotyl and cotyledons of all observed taxa are glabrous. The cotyledons are elliptical to obovate and have an entire margin. The cotyledons are slightly fleshy and green, which is also observed in those of Cocciniaabyssinica (Getahun 1974a), and the cotyledonous apex has a pale marking and is obtuse to retuse. Getahun reports that the prominent veins and the margins on the lower cotyledon surface in Cocciniaabyssinica are covered with multicellular trichomes. However, prominent veins in Cocciniaabyssinica cotyledons cannot be confirmed, and if multicellular trichomes occur, then they are not visible to the naked eye. The first normal leaf in this species, however, emerges in the axilla of the cotyledons (N. Holstein 132, Fig. 4a), and thus might have been confused.


Monograph of Coccinia (Cucurbitaceae).

Holstein N - PhytoKeys (2015)

a Young plant of Cocciniaabyssinica (N. Holstein 132). The first node is in the axilla where the glabrous cotyledons split off. The first nodes lack probracts and tendrils b Young plant of Cocciniasessilifolia (N. Holstein 131). The first leaves in this species are petiolate, sessile leaves are produced later-on. The glabrous cotyledons are already dried (plant had the same age as the one in Fig. 4a).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4547038&req=5

Figure 4: a Young plant of Cocciniaabyssinica (N. Holstein 132). The first node is in the axilla where the glabrous cotyledons split off. The first nodes lack probracts and tendrils b Young plant of Cocciniasessilifolia (N. Holstein 131). The first leaves in this species are petiolate, sessile leaves are produced later-on. The glabrous cotyledons are already dried (plant had the same age as the one in Fig. 4a).
Mentions: Zimmermann (1922b) reports epigeous cotyledons for Cocciniagrandiflora and Cocciniagrandis, of which the latter is confirmed by personal observations (Fig. 1a). Epigeous cotyledons also occur in Cocciniaabyssinica, Cocciniaadoensisvar.jeffreyana, Cocciniamicrophylla, Cocciniarehmanniiaff. var.littoralis, and Cocciniasessilifolia. The hypocotyl and cotyledons of all observed taxa are glabrous. The cotyledons are elliptical to obovate and have an entire margin. The cotyledons are slightly fleshy and green, which is also observed in those of Cocciniaabyssinica (Getahun 1974a), and the cotyledonous apex has a pale marking and is obtuse to retuse. Getahun reports that the prominent veins and the margins on the lower cotyledon surface in Cocciniaabyssinica are covered with multicellular trichomes. However, prominent veins in Cocciniaabyssinica cotyledons cannot be confirmed, and if multicellular trichomes occur, then they are not visible to the naked eye. The first normal leaf in this species, however, emerges in the axilla of the cotyledons (N. Holstein 132, Fig. 4a), and thus might have been confused.

Bottom Line: Chromosome numbers are 2n = 20, 24, and 22 + XX/XY.Many Coccinia species are used for food, either as roasted tubers, greens as spinach, or the fruits as vegetables.Medicinal value is established in Cocciniagrandis, of which leaves and sap are used against diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nees-Institute for Biodiversity of Plants, Meckenheimer Allee 170, 53115 Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This monograph deals with all 95 names described in the Cucurbitaceae genus Coccinia and recognizes 25 species. Taxonomic novelties are Cocciniaadoensisvar.aurantiaca (C.Jeffrey) Holstein, stat. nov., Cocciniasessilifoliavar.variifolia (A.Meeuse) Holstein, stat. nov., and Cocciniaadoensisvar.jeffreyana Holstein, var. nov. For the 25 species 3157 collections were examined, of which 2024 were georeferenced to produce distribution maps. All species are distributed in sub-Saharan Africa with one species, Cocciniagrandis, extending from Senegal in West Africa east to Indonesia and being naturalized on Pacific Islands, in Australia, the Caribbean, and South America. Coccinia species are dioecious creepers or climbers with simple or bifid tendrils that occupy a range of habitats from arid scrubland, woodlands to lowland rainforest and mist forest. The corolla of Coccinia species is sympetalous, usually pale yellow to orange, and 1 to 4.5 cm long. Pollination is by bees foraging for pollen or nectar. After pollination, the developing ovary often exhibits longitudinal mottling, which usually disappears during maturation. All species produce berries with a pericarp in reddish colors (orange-red through to scarlet red), hence the generic name. The globose to cylindrical fruits contain numerous grayish-beige flat to lenticular seeds. Chromosome numbers are 2n = 20, 24, and 22 + XX/XY. Many Coccinia species are used for food, either as roasted tubers, greens as spinach, or the fruits as vegetables. Medicinal value is established in Cocciniagrandis, of which leaves and sap are used against diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus