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Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists.

Butovskaya ML, Lazebny OE, Vasilyev VA, Dronova DA, Karelin DV, Mabulla AZ, Shibalev DV, Shackelford TK, Fink B, Ryskov AP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction.We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates.In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Human Ethology, Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.

ABSTRACT
The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)--the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17-70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The association between the number of children and fathers’ age in Hadza and Datoga separately represented by five age groups (1 –fathers younger than 20 years of age; 2 –fathers from 20 to younger than 30 years of age; 3 –fathers from 30 to younger than 40 years of age; 4 –fathers from 40 to younger than 50 years of age; 5 –fathers from 50 years of age and older).
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pone.0136208.g003: The association between the number of children and fathers’ age in Hadza and Datoga separately represented by five age groups (1 –fathers younger than 20 years of age; 2 –fathers from 20 to younger than 30 years of age; 3 –fathers from 30 to younger than 40 years of age; 4 –fathers from 40 to younger than 50 years of age; 5 –fathers from 50 years of age and older).

Mentions: Table 5 reports the mean number of children per age group for the Hadza and Datoga. Age groups 5 and 6 (50–59 year olds and 60+ year olds) were combined into one group, as there were only a few participants (n = 10 and 12, respectively) in the 60+ group. Older men had more children than younger men. The Hadza men had more children than Datoga men between 20–29 years, whereas a tendency to have more children after the age of 40 in Datoga men was demonstrated (Table 5, Fig 3). Datoga men had more children than Hadza after the age of 50 (Table 5).


Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists.

Butovskaya ML, Lazebny OE, Vasilyev VA, Dronova DA, Karelin DV, Mabulla AZ, Shibalev DV, Shackelford TK, Fink B, Ryskov AP - PLoS ONE (2015)

The association between the number of children and fathers’ age in Hadza and Datoga separately represented by five age groups (1 –fathers younger than 20 years of age; 2 –fathers from 20 to younger than 30 years of age; 3 –fathers from 30 to younger than 40 years of age; 4 –fathers from 40 to younger than 50 years of age; 5 –fathers from 50 years of age and older).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4546275&req=5

pone.0136208.g003: The association between the number of children and fathers’ age in Hadza and Datoga separately represented by five age groups (1 –fathers younger than 20 years of age; 2 –fathers from 20 to younger than 30 years of age; 3 –fathers from 30 to younger than 40 years of age; 4 –fathers from 40 to younger than 50 years of age; 5 –fathers from 50 years of age and older).
Mentions: Table 5 reports the mean number of children per age group for the Hadza and Datoga. Age groups 5 and 6 (50–59 year olds and 60+ year olds) were combined into one group, as there were only a few participants (n = 10 and 12, respectively) in the 60+ group. Older men had more children than younger men. The Hadza men had more children than Datoga men between 20–29 years, whereas a tendency to have more children after the age of 40 in Datoga men was demonstrated (Table 5, Fig 3). Datoga men had more children than Hadza after the age of 50 (Table 5).

Bottom Line: The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction.We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates.In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Human Ethology, Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.

ABSTRACT
The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)--the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17-70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus