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The effect of the facilitated tucking position in reducing vaccination-induced pain in newborns.

Kucukoglu S, Kurt S, Aytekin A - Ital J Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Also, the infants' physiological parameters were compared before, during, and after the procedure.The mean pain scores of infants vaccinated in the facilitated tucking position (2.83 ± 1.18) were significantly statistically lower than the scores of infants vaccinated in the classical holding position (6.47 ± 1.07) (p < 0.05).The facilitated tucking position, a non-pharmacological method, is recommended as an effective and useful method for reducing pain during the procedure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child Health Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum, Turkey. s_nadaroglu@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was conducted to evaluate the pain perceptions of newborns during the hepatitis B (HBV) vaccinations performed in the facilitated tucking position and the classical holding position, respectively.

Methods: The randomized controlled experimental study was conducted between 1 September 2014 and 30 December 2014 at the neonatal intensive care unit of a Turkish university hospital. One group of infants was held in the facilitated tucking position (the treatment group; n = 30) during HBV vaccination; infants in the other group were held in the classical holding position (the control group; n = 30) during HBV vaccination. The Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) scores of the infants in the treatment and control groups were compared during procedure. Also, the infants' physiological parameters were compared before, during, and after the procedure. Descriptive statistics, a chi-square test, and an independent samples t-test were used to assess the data.

Results: The mean pain scores of infants vaccinated in the facilitated tucking position (2.83 ± 1.18) were significantly statistically lower than the scores of infants vaccinated in the classical holding position (6.47 ± 1.07) (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: The pain perceptions of newborns held in the facilitated tucking position during HBV vaccination were lower. The facilitated tucking position, a non-pharmacological method, is recommended as an effective and useful method for reducing pain during the procedure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The infant in the classical holding position
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Fig3: The infant in the classical holding position

Mentions: No application was performed on the newborns in the control group. Vaccination was performed in the supine position on infants in this group as routine clinical practice. The leg that received the vaccination was brought to a straight position (classical holding position) (Fig. 3), and 70 % alcohol was used to clean the area to be vaccinated in accordance with the clinical protocol. After the alcohol had evaporated, the vaccination was performed by the nurse practitioner. Video recording was started 1 min before vaccination and ended 1 min after. The physiological parameters measured by the bedside monitor (heart rate, body temperature, respiration, oxygen saturation) were recorded on the Intervention Follow-up Form before, during, and after the procedure.Fig. 3


The effect of the facilitated tucking position in reducing vaccination-induced pain in newborns.

Kucukoglu S, Kurt S, Aytekin A - Ital J Pediatr (2015)

The infant in the classical holding position
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4546124&req=5

Fig3: The infant in the classical holding position
Mentions: No application was performed on the newborns in the control group. Vaccination was performed in the supine position on infants in this group as routine clinical practice. The leg that received the vaccination was brought to a straight position (classical holding position) (Fig. 3), and 70 % alcohol was used to clean the area to be vaccinated in accordance with the clinical protocol. After the alcohol had evaporated, the vaccination was performed by the nurse practitioner. Video recording was started 1 min before vaccination and ended 1 min after. The physiological parameters measured by the bedside monitor (heart rate, body temperature, respiration, oxygen saturation) were recorded on the Intervention Follow-up Form before, during, and after the procedure.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Also, the infants' physiological parameters were compared before, during, and after the procedure.The mean pain scores of infants vaccinated in the facilitated tucking position (2.83 ± 1.18) were significantly statistically lower than the scores of infants vaccinated in the classical holding position (6.47 ± 1.07) (p < 0.05).The facilitated tucking position, a non-pharmacological method, is recommended as an effective and useful method for reducing pain during the procedure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child Health Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum, Turkey. s_nadaroglu@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was conducted to evaluate the pain perceptions of newborns during the hepatitis B (HBV) vaccinations performed in the facilitated tucking position and the classical holding position, respectively.

Methods: The randomized controlled experimental study was conducted between 1 September 2014 and 30 December 2014 at the neonatal intensive care unit of a Turkish university hospital. One group of infants was held in the facilitated tucking position (the treatment group; n = 30) during HBV vaccination; infants in the other group were held in the classical holding position (the control group; n = 30) during HBV vaccination. The Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) scores of the infants in the treatment and control groups were compared during procedure. Also, the infants' physiological parameters were compared before, during, and after the procedure. Descriptive statistics, a chi-square test, and an independent samples t-test were used to assess the data.

Results: The mean pain scores of infants vaccinated in the facilitated tucking position (2.83 ± 1.18) were significantly statistically lower than the scores of infants vaccinated in the classical holding position (6.47 ± 1.07) (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: The pain perceptions of newborns held in the facilitated tucking position during HBV vaccination were lower. The facilitated tucking position, a non-pharmacological method, is recommended as an effective and useful method for reducing pain during the procedure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus