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Nutrigenomic effects of edible bird's nest on insulin signaling in ovariectomized rats.

Hou Z, Imam MU, Ismail M, Ooi DJ, Ideris A, Mahmud R - Drug Des Devel Ther (2015)

Bottom Line: Hormone replacement therapy has been used to improve quality of life and prevent complications, but side effects limit its use.The results showed that ovariectomy worsened metabolic indices and disrupted the normal transcriptional pattern of hepatic insulin signaling genes.The clinical validity of these findings is worth studying further.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia ; Department of Pathology, Chengde Medical University, Chengde, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Estrogen deficiency alters quality of life during menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been used to improve quality of life and prevent complications, but side effects limit its use. In this study, we evaluated the use of edible bird's nest (EBN) for prevention of cardiometabolic problems in rats with ovariectomy-induced menopause. Ovariectomized female rats were fed for 12 weeks with normal rat chow, EBN, or estrogen and compared with normal non-ovariectomized rats. Metabolic indices (insulin, estrogen, superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde, oral glucose tolerance test, and lipid profile) were measured at the end of the experiment from serum and liver tissue homogenate, and transcriptional levels of hepatic insulin signaling genes were measured. The results showed that ovariectomy worsened metabolic indices and disrupted the normal transcriptional pattern of hepatic insulin signaling genes. EBN improved the metabolic indices and also produced transcriptional changes in hepatic insulin signaling genes that tended toward enhanced insulin sensitivity, and glucose and lipid homeostasis, even better than estrogen. The data suggest that EBN could meliorate estrogen deficiency-associated increase in risk of cardiometabolic disease in rats, and may in fact be useful as a functional food for the prevention of such a problem in humans. The clinical validity of these findings is worth studying further.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of 12 weeks of supplementation with EBN on (A) serum insulin and (B) HOMA-IR in ovariectomized rats.Notes: EBN high, 3% EBN; EBN low, 1.5% EBN. Different letters for bars in each panel indicate a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). All rat groups received standard rat chow for 12 weeks, and in addition, the estrogen treated groups received 0.2 mg/kg/day of estrogen, while EBN groups received 3% or 1.5% EBN in their rat chow.Abbreviations: EBN, edible bird’s nest; OVX, ovariectomy; HOMA-IR, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance.
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f2-dddt-9-4115: Effects of 12 weeks of supplementation with EBN on (A) serum insulin and (B) HOMA-IR in ovariectomized rats.Notes: EBN high, 3% EBN; EBN low, 1.5% EBN. Different letters for bars in each panel indicate a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). All rat groups received standard rat chow for 12 weeks, and in addition, the estrogen treated groups received 0.2 mg/kg/day of estrogen, while EBN groups received 3% or 1.5% EBN in their rat chow.Abbreviations: EBN, edible bird’s nest; OVX, ovariectomy; HOMA-IR, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance.

Mentions: The OGTT results are shown in Figure 1. The glycemic response in the OVX group was impaired in comparison with the other groups, which showed similar and significantly (P<0.05) lower responses (Figure 1A). Moreover, the area under the curve for glucose over 120 minutes (Figure 1B) was significantly lower (P<0.05) for the EBN and estrogen treatments in comparison with the OVX group. Additionally, the insulin level was highest in the OVX group, which could have been a counter-response to the loss of estrogen-regulated insulin action in the rats (Figure 2). The estrogen group, on the other hand, showed significantly lower insulin levels (P<0.05), while the EBN groups were not significantly different from the OVX group. HOMA-IR results showed that the OVX group had the highest tendency for insulin resistance, while estrogen therapy significantly improved insulin sensitivity (P<0.05). These effects of OVX and estrogen therapy mirror what has been reported previously;4 OVX tends to increase the risk of insulin resistance, which can be prevented by estrogen therapy. EBN treatments showed dose-dependent effects on insulin sensitivity, but only the 3% EBN treatment showed significantly better results than those seen in the OVX group. Although estrogen may prevent the OVX-induced risk of insulin resistance as demonstrated in the present study (lower HOMA-IR in the estrogen group), EBN may be preferred since its consumption is not associated with side effects as with estrogen therapy, except when it is adulterated.9


Nutrigenomic effects of edible bird's nest on insulin signaling in ovariectomized rats.

Hou Z, Imam MU, Ismail M, Ooi DJ, Ideris A, Mahmud R - Drug Des Devel Ther (2015)

Effects of 12 weeks of supplementation with EBN on (A) serum insulin and (B) HOMA-IR in ovariectomized rats.Notes: EBN high, 3% EBN; EBN low, 1.5% EBN. Different letters for bars in each panel indicate a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). All rat groups received standard rat chow for 12 weeks, and in addition, the estrogen treated groups received 0.2 mg/kg/day of estrogen, while EBN groups received 3% or 1.5% EBN in their rat chow.Abbreviations: EBN, edible bird’s nest; OVX, ovariectomy; HOMA-IR, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544723&req=5

f2-dddt-9-4115: Effects of 12 weeks of supplementation with EBN on (A) serum insulin and (B) HOMA-IR in ovariectomized rats.Notes: EBN high, 3% EBN; EBN low, 1.5% EBN. Different letters for bars in each panel indicate a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). All rat groups received standard rat chow for 12 weeks, and in addition, the estrogen treated groups received 0.2 mg/kg/day of estrogen, while EBN groups received 3% or 1.5% EBN in their rat chow.Abbreviations: EBN, edible bird’s nest; OVX, ovariectomy; HOMA-IR, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance.
Mentions: The OGTT results are shown in Figure 1. The glycemic response in the OVX group was impaired in comparison with the other groups, which showed similar and significantly (P<0.05) lower responses (Figure 1A). Moreover, the area under the curve for glucose over 120 minutes (Figure 1B) was significantly lower (P<0.05) for the EBN and estrogen treatments in comparison with the OVX group. Additionally, the insulin level was highest in the OVX group, which could have been a counter-response to the loss of estrogen-regulated insulin action in the rats (Figure 2). The estrogen group, on the other hand, showed significantly lower insulin levels (P<0.05), while the EBN groups were not significantly different from the OVX group. HOMA-IR results showed that the OVX group had the highest tendency for insulin resistance, while estrogen therapy significantly improved insulin sensitivity (P<0.05). These effects of OVX and estrogen therapy mirror what has been reported previously;4 OVX tends to increase the risk of insulin resistance, which can be prevented by estrogen therapy. EBN treatments showed dose-dependent effects on insulin sensitivity, but only the 3% EBN treatment showed significantly better results than those seen in the OVX group. Although estrogen may prevent the OVX-induced risk of insulin resistance as demonstrated in the present study (lower HOMA-IR in the estrogen group), EBN may be preferred since its consumption is not associated with side effects as with estrogen therapy, except when it is adulterated.9

Bottom Line: Hormone replacement therapy has been used to improve quality of life and prevent complications, but side effects limit its use.The results showed that ovariectomy worsened metabolic indices and disrupted the normal transcriptional pattern of hepatic insulin signaling genes.The clinical validity of these findings is worth studying further.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia ; Department of Pathology, Chengde Medical University, Chengde, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Estrogen deficiency alters quality of life during menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been used to improve quality of life and prevent complications, but side effects limit its use. In this study, we evaluated the use of edible bird's nest (EBN) for prevention of cardiometabolic problems in rats with ovariectomy-induced menopause. Ovariectomized female rats were fed for 12 weeks with normal rat chow, EBN, or estrogen and compared with normal non-ovariectomized rats. Metabolic indices (insulin, estrogen, superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde, oral glucose tolerance test, and lipid profile) were measured at the end of the experiment from serum and liver tissue homogenate, and transcriptional levels of hepatic insulin signaling genes were measured. The results showed that ovariectomy worsened metabolic indices and disrupted the normal transcriptional pattern of hepatic insulin signaling genes. EBN improved the metabolic indices and also produced transcriptional changes in hepatic insulin signaling genes that tended toward enhanced insulin sensitivity, and glucose and lipid homeostasis, even better than estrogen. The data suggest that EBN could meliorate estrogen deficiency-associated increase in risk of cardiometabolic disease in rats, and may in fact be useful as a functional food for the prevention of such a problem in humans. The clinical validity of these findings is worth studying further.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus