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Application of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for Diagnosis of Caries, Cracks, and Defects of Restorations.

Shimada Y, Sadr A, Sumi Y, Tagami J - Curr Oral Health Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive technique providing cross-sectional images of a tooth structure.This review describes the use of OCT for detecting dental caries, tooth fractures, and interfacial gaps in intraoral restorations.OCT can be a reliable and an accurate method and a safer alternative to X-ray radiography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive technique providing cross-sectional images of a tooth structure. This review describes the use of OCT for detecting dental caries, tooth fractures, and interfacial gaps in intraoral restorations. OCT can be a reliable and an accurate method and a safer alternative to X-ray radiography.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dental caries in first and second premolars. a Occlusal view before the surgical treatment. Underlying dark shadows were visually observed at the first and second premolars (arrow). SS-OCT observation was performed along red line. b Occlusal view during the cavity preparation. Presence of deep lesions with softened dentin was obvious (white arrow). c SS-OCT image at red line in (a) before cavity preparation. Bright zone indicates the increased light scattering in porous demineralized tissue (blue arrow). A strong reflection penetrating along the DEJ indicates the lesion is “cavitated” (red arrow)
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Fig1: Dental caries in first and second premolars. a Occlusal view before the surgical treatment. Underlying dark shadows were visually observed at the first and second premolars (arrow). SS-OCT observation was performed along red line. b Occlusal view during the cavity preparation. Presence of deep lesions with softened dentin was obvious (white arrow). c SS-OCT image at red line in (a) before cavity preparation. Bright zone indicates the increased light scattering in porous demineralized tissue (blue arrow). A strong reflection penetrating along the DEJ indicates the lesion is “cavitated” (red arrow)

Mentions: Strong reflection from the material surfaces appears to be effective in conventional OCT setups for detecting the reflective signal from the fault, e.g., the border of cavitated caries, tooth fractures, and interfacial gaps of tooth restorations [13••, 17••, 18–20, Figs. 1, 2, and 3]. In addition, several lines of evidence report that the reflectivity of smooth surface caries lesions can be distinguished against sound enamel with OCT without polarization sensitivity, and the lesion contrast can be evaluated by post acquisition image processing [22, 29, 30, 32, 33•, 51–54].Fig. 1


Application of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for Diagnosis of Caries, Cracks, and Defects of Restorations.

Shimada Y, Sadr A, Sumi Y, Tagami J - Curr Oral Health Rep (2015)

Dental caries in first and second premolars. a Occlusal view before the surgical treatment. Underlying dark shadows were visually observed at the first and second premolars (arrow). SS-OCT observation was performed along red line. b Occlusal view during the cavity preparation. Presence of deep lesions with softened dentin was obvious (white arrow). c SS-OCT image at red line in (a) before cavity preparation. Bright zone indicates the increased light scattering in porous demineralized tissue (blue arrow). A strong reflection penetrating along the DEJ indicates the lesion is “cavitated” (red arrow)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Dental caries in first and second premolars. a Occlusal view before the surgical treatment. Underlying dark shadows were visually observed at the first and second premolars (arrow). SS-OCT observation was performed along red line. b Occlusal view during the cavity preparation. Presence of deep lesions with softened dentin was obvious (white arrow). c SS-OCT image at red line in (a) before cavity preparation. Bright zone indicates the increased light scattering in porous demineralized tissue (blue arrow). A strong reflection penetrating along the DEJ indicates the lesion is “cavitated” (red arrow)
Mentions: Strong reflection from the material surfaces appears to be effective in conventional OCT setups for detecting the reflective signal from the fault, e.g., the border of cavitated caries, tooth fractures, and interfacial gaps of tooth restorations [13••, 17••, 18–20, Figs. 1, 2, and 3]. In addition, several lines of evidence report that the reflectivity of smooth surface caries lesions can be distinguished against sound enamel with OCT without polarization sensitivity, and the lesion contrast can be evaluated by post acquisition image processing [22, 29, 30, 32, 33•, 51–54].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive technique providing cross-sectional images of a tooth structure.This review describes the use of OCT for detecting dental caries, tooth fractures, and interfacial gaps in intraoral restorations.OCT can be a reliable and an accurate method and a safer alternative to X-ray radiography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive technique providing cross-sectional images of a tooth structure. This review describes the use of OCT for detecting dental caries, tooth fractures, and interfacial gaps in intraoral restorations. OCT can be a reliable and an accurate method and a safer alternative to X-ray radiography.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus