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Coronary Perforation Complicating Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - A Case Illustration and Review.

Chin Yong A, Wei Chieh JT - ASEAN Heart J (2013)

Bottom Line: Coronary perforation is a potentially fatal complication during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Reports have shown that it occurs in 0.2 to 0.6% of all patients undergoing the procedures. [1-3] Though the frequency of coronary perforation is low, it is a serious and potentially life-threatening situation that warrants prompt recognition and management.Here we illustrate a case of coronary perforation, and review the incidence, causes, clinical sequelae and management of coronary perforation in the current contemporary practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Coronary perforation is a potentially fatal complication during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Reports have shown that it occurs in 0.2 to 0.6% of all patients undergoing the procedures. [1-3] Though the frequency of coronary perforation is low, it is a serious and potentially life-threatening situation that warrants prompt recognition and management. Here we illustrate a case of coronary perforation, and review the incidence, causes, clinical sequelae and management of coronary perforation in the current contemporary practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a. Autologous vein graft covered stentb. PTFE-covered stent (JOSTENT Graftmaster)
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Fig4: a. Autologous vein graft covered stentb. PTFE-covered stent (JOSTENT Graftmaster)

Mentions: If coronary artery perforation persists despite prolonged balloon inflation and reversal of anticoagulation, a covered stent can be used, especially for perforation at the proximal or mid-segment of the involved artery. Autologous vein graft stent has been used successfully before the commercially available covered stents with poly-tetrafluorethylene( PTFE) and pericardium. [36,37,38,39] This stent needs to be assembled by the operator during the procedure; thus takes time and prolonged balloon inflation at the perforation site is required.(Figure 4) A saphenous, antecubital, or cephalic autologous vein is harvested surgically and fixed to a bare metal stent with the stent then be hand-crimped onto a balloon. Successful closure of a coronary perforation with a make-shift stent sandwich by cutting a cylindrical portion of balloon material and used it as a membrane sand-wiched between two stents, was also reported.[40]


Coronary Perforation Complicating Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - A Case Illustration and Review.

Chin Yong A, Wei Chieh JT - ASEAN Heart J (2013)

a. Autologous vein graft covered stentb. PTFE-covered stent (JOSTENT Graftmaster)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544476&req=5

Fig4: a. Autologous vein graft covered stentb. PTFE-covered stent (JOSTENT Graftmaster)
Mentions: If coronary artery perforation persists despite prolonged balloon inflation and reversal of anticoagulation, a covered stent can be used, especially for perforation at the proximal or mid-segment of the involved artery. Autologous vein graft stent has been used successfully before the commercially available covered stents with poly-tetrafluorethylene( PTFE) and pericardium. [36,37,38,39] This stent needs to be assembled by the operator during the procedure; thus takes time and prolonged balloon inflation at the perforation site is required.(Figure 4) A saphenous, antecubital, or cephalic autologous vein is harvested surgically and fixed to a bare metal stent with the stent then be hand-crimped onto a balloon. Successful closure of a coronary perforation with a make-shift stent sandwich by cutting a cylindrical portion of balloon material and used it as a membrane sand-wiched between two stents, was also reported.[40]

Bottom Line: Coronary perforation is a potentially fatal complication during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Reports have shown that it occurs in 0.2 to 0.6% of all patients undergoing the procedures. [1-3] Though the frequency of coronary perforation is low, it is a serious and potentially life-threatening situation that warrants prompt recognition and management.Here we illustrate a case of coronary perforation, and review the incidence, causes, clinical sequelae and management of coronary perforation in the current contemporary practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Coronary perforation is a potentially fatal complication during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Reports have shown that it occurs in 0.2 to 0.6% of all patients undergoing the procedures. [1-3] Though the frequency of coronary perforation is low, it is a serious and potentially life-threatening situation that warrants prompt recognition and management. Here we illustrate a case of coronary perforation, and review the incidence, causes, clinical sequelae and management of coronary perforation in the current contemporary practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus