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Subjective and objective results 1 year after robotic sacrocolpopexy using a lightweight Y-mesh.

Culligan PJ, Gurshumov E, Lewis C, Priestley JL, Komar J, Shah N, Salamon CG - Int Urogynecol J (2013)

Bottom Line: There were no mesh erosions or exposures, and mesh edges were not palpable in any patient.At 12 months the clinical cure rate was 95 %, and the objective anatomic cure rate was 84 %.The PFDI-20 mean score improved from 98 at baseline to 17 at 12 months (p < 0.0001); PFIQ-7 scores improved from 59 to 6.5 (p < 0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Atlantic Health System, Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, 435 South Street, Suite 370, Morristown, NJ, 07960, USA, patrick.culligan@atlantichealth.org.

ABSTRACT

Introduction and hypothesis: The objective of this study was to assess outcomes following robotic sacrocolpopexy using a lightweight polypropylene Y-mesh.

Methods: During our study period, all patients who underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy were enrolled in this single-arm prospective trial. Endpoints included Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) values; Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, short form 20 (PFDI-20); Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, short form 7 (PFIQ-7); Surgical Satisfaction scores; and the Sandvik Incontinence Severity Index. All surgeries were performed with a pre-configured monofilament type 1 polypropylene Y-mesh (Alyte©, C.R. Bard, Covington, GA, USA). Cure rates at 12 months were calculated using two separate definitions: (1) "clinical cure": no POP-Q points > 0, point C ≤ -5, no prolapse symptoms on the PFDI-20, and no reoperations for prolapse and (2) "objective anatomic cure": POP-Q stage 0 or 1, point C of ≤ -5, and no reoperations for prolapse.

Results: A total of 150 patients underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy and 143 (95 %) were available for 12-month follow-up. Mean age was 58.6 ± 9.8 and mean body mass index was 26.3 ± 4.5. Mean operative time and blood loss were 148 ± 27.6 min (range 75-250 min) and 51.2 ± 32, respectively. There were no mesh erosions or exposures, and mesh edges were not palpable in any patient. At 12 months the clinical cure rate was 95 %, and the objective anatomic cure rate was 84 %. The PFDI-20 mean score improved from 98 at baseline to 17 at 12 months (p < 0.0001); PFIQ-7 scores improved from 59 to 6.5 (p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Robotic sacrocolpopexy using this lightweight polypropylene Y-mesh offers excellent subjective and objective results at 1 year.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Point C over time
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Fig3: Point C over time

Mentions: The objective anatomic cure rate was 84 % (120/143). Of the 23 objective anatomic failures, 15 were in the anterior compartment, 7 in the posterior compartment, and 1 at the apex. Figures 1, 2, and 3 show the mean POP-Q points Ba, Bp, and C over the study period. Table 2 includes pre- and postoperative comparisons for our secondary outcome measures.Fig. 1


Subjective and objective results 1 year after robotic sacrocolpopexy using a lightweight Y-mesh.

Culligan PJ, Gurshumov E, Lewis C, Priestley JL, Komar J, Shah N, Salamon CG - Int Urogynecol J (2013)

Point C over time
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544463&req=5

Fig3: Point C over time
Mentions: The objective anatomic cure rate was 84 % (120/143). Of the 23 objective anatomic failures, 15 were in the anterior compartment, 7 in the posterior compartment, and 1 at the apex. Figures 1, 2, and 3 show the mean POP-Q points Ba, Bp, and C over the study period. Table 2 includes pre- and postoperative comparisons for our secondary outcome measures.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: There were no mesh erosions or exposures, and mesh edges were not palpable in any patient.At 12 months the clinical cure rate was 95 %, and the objective anatomic cure rate was 84 %.The PFDI-20 mean score improved from 98 at baseline to 17 at 12 months (p < 0.0001); PFIQ-7 scores improved from 59 to 6.5 (p < 0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Atlantic Health System, Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, 435 South Street, Suite 370, Morristown, NJ, 07960, USA, patrick.culligan@atlantichealth.org.

ABSTRACT

Introduction and hypothesis: The objective of this study was to assess outcomes following robotic sacrocolpopexy using a lightweight polypropylene Y-mesh.

Methods: During our study period, all patients who underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy were enrolled in this single-arm prospective trial. Endpoints included Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) values; Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, short form 20 (PFDI-20); Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, short form 7 (PFIQ-7); Surgical Satisfaction scores; and the Sandvik Incontinence Severity Index. All surgeries were performed with a pre-configured monofilament type 1 polypropylene Y-mesh (Alyte©, C.R. Bard, Covington, GA, USA). Cure rates at 12 months were calculated using two separate definitions: (1) "clinical cure": no POP-Q points > 0, point C ≤ -5, no prolapse symptoms on the PFDI-20, and no reoperations for prolapse and (2) "objective anatomic cure": POP-Q stage 0 or 1, point C of ≤ -5, and no reoperations for prolapse.

Results: A total of 150 patients underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy and 143 (95 %) were available for 12-month follow-up. Mean age was 58.6 ± 9.8 and mean body mass index was 26.3 ± 4.5. Mean operative time and blood loss were 148 ± 27.6 min (range 75-250 min) and 51.2 ± 32, respectively. There were no mesh erosions or exposures, and mesh edges were not palpable in any patient. At 12 months the clinical cure rate was 95 %, and the objective anatomic cure rate was 84 %. The PFDI-20 mean score improved from 98 at baseline to 17 at 12 months (p < 0.0001); PFIQ-7 scores improved from 59 to 6.5 (p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Robotic sacrocolpopexy using this lightweight polypropylene Y-mesh offers excellent subjective and objective results at 1 year.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus