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Invaders in hot water: a simple decontamination method to prevent the accidental spread of aquatic invasive non-native species.

Anderson LG, Dunn AM, Rosewarne PJ, Stebbing PD - Biol. Invasions (2015)

Bottom Line: Drying caused significantly higher mortality than the control (no action) from day 4 (χ(2) = 8.49, p < 0.01) onwards.In the absence of hot water or drying, 6/7 of these species survived for 16 days, highlighting the importance of good biosecurity practice to reduce the risk of accidental spread.Hot water provides a simple, rapid and effective method to clean equipment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT UK.

ABSTRACT

Watersports equipment can act as a vector for the introduction and spread of invasive non native species (INNS) in freshwater environments. To support advice given to recreational water users under the UK Government's Check Clean Dry biosecurity campaign and ensure its effectiveness at killing a range of aquatic INNS, we conducted a survival experiment on seven INNS which pose a high risk to UK freshwaters. The efficacy of exposure to hot water (45 °C, 15 min) was tested as a method by which waters users could 'clean' their equipment and was compared to drying and a control group (no treatment). Hot water had caused 99 % mortality across all species 1 h after treatment and was more effective than drying at all time points (1 h: χ(2) = 117.24, p < 0.001; 1 day χ(2) = 95.68, p < 0.001; 8 days χ(2) = 12.16, p < 0.001 and 16 days χ(2) = 7.58, p < 0.001). Drying caused significantly higher mortality than the control (no action) from day 4 (χ(2) = 8.49, p < 0.01) onwards. In the absence of hot water or drying, 6/7 of these species survived for 16 days, highlighting the importance of good biosecurity practice to reduce the risk of accidental spread. In an additional experiment the minimum lethal temperature and exposure time in hot water to cause 100 % mortality in American signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), was determined to be 5 min at 40 °C. Hot water provides a simple, rapid and effective method to clean equipment. We recommend that it is advocated in future biosecurity awareness campaigns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dose response curves showing projected survival over time for hot water only (red line), drying (black line and data points) and control (dashed line) treatments. The solid line shows projected survival for the drying treatment. The dashed line shows projected survival for the control treatment and the red line shows projected survival for the clean treatment
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Fig1: Dose response curves showing projected survival over time for hot water only (red line), drying (black line and data points) and control (dashed line) treatments. The solid line shows projected survival for the drying treatment. The dashed line shows projected survival for the control treatment and the red line shows projected survival for the clean treatment

Mentions: Mortality differed between treatments and increased over time for all treatments. The hot water treatment and hot water and drying treatment resulted in 99 and 97 % mortality within 1 h, respectively, whereas it took 7.52 days to reach LT90 with the drying treatment and a projected 17.16 days to reach LT90 for the control group (Fig. 1, Table 2).Fig. 1


Invaders in hot water: a simple decontamination method to prevent the accidental spread of aquatic invasive non-native species.

Anderson LG, Dunn AM, Rosewarne PJ, Stebbing PD - Biol. Invasions (2015)

Dose response curves showing projected survival over time for hot water only (red line), drying (black line and data points) and control (dashed line) treatments. The solid line shows projected survival for the drying treatment. The dashed line shows projected survival for the control treatment and the red line shows projected survival for the clean treatment
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544425&req=5

Fig1: Dose response curves showing projected survival over time for hot water only (red line), drying (black line and data points) and control (dashed line) treatments. The solid line shows projected survival for the drying treatment. The dashed line shows projected survival for the control treatment and the red line shows projected survival for the clean treatment
Mentions: Mortality differed between treatments and increased over time for all treatments. The hot water treatment and hot water and drying treatment resulted in 99 and 97 % mortality within 1 h, respectively, whereas it took 7.52 days to reach LT90 with the drying treatment and a projected 17.16 days to reach LT90 for the control group (Fig. 1, Table 2).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Drying caused significantly higher mortality than the control (no action) from day 4 (χ(2) = 8.49, p < 0.01) onwards.In the absence of hot water or drying, 6/7 of these species survived for 16 days, highlighting the importance of good biosecurity practice to reduce the risk of accidental spread.Hot water provides a simple, rapid and effective method to clean equipment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT UK.

ABSTRACT

Watersports equipment can act as a vector for the introduction and spread of invasive non native species (INNS) in freshwater environments. To support advice given to recreational water users under the UK Government's Check Clean Dry biosecurity campaign and ensure its effectiveness at killing a range of aquatic INNS, we conducted a survival experiment on seven INNS which pose a high risk to UK freshwaters. The efficacy of exposure to hot water (45 °C, 15 min) was tested as a method by which waters users could 'clean' their equipment and was compared to drying and a control group (no treatment). Hot water had caused 99 % mortality across all species 1 h after treatment and was more effective than drying at all time points (1 h: χ(2) = 117.24, p < 0.001; 1 day χ(2) = 95.68, p < 0.001; 8 days χ(2) = 12.16, p < 0.001 and 16 days χ(2) = 7.58, p < 0.001). Drying caused significantly higher mortality than the control (no action) from day 4 (χ(2) = 8.49, p < 0.01) onwards. In the absence of hot water or drying, 6/7 of these species survived for 16 days, highlighting the importance of good biosecurity practice to reduce the risk of accidental spread. In an additional experiment the minimum lethal temperature and exposure time in hot water to cause 100 % mortality in American signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), was determined to be 5 min at 40 °C. Hot water provides a simple, rapid and effective method to clean equipment. We recommend that it is advocated in future biosecurity awareness campaigns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus