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Effect of the exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood on the body mass index until adolescence.

Muraro AP, Gonçalves-Silva RM, Ferreira MG, Silva GA, Sichieri R - Rev Saude Publica (2015)

Bottom Line: METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old) from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405).RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2%) also smoked during early childhood.Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59), 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Saúde Coletiva, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Cuiabá, MT, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE Investigate the effect of exposure to smoking during pregnancy and early childhood on changes in the body mass index (BMI) from birth to adolescence. METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old) from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405). Between 2009 and 2011, the cohort was re-evaluated. Information about birth weight was obtained from medical records, and exposure to smoking during pregnancy and childhood was assessed at the first interview. Linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the association between exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and preschool age, and the body mass index of children at birth, childhood and adolescence. RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2%) also smoked during early childhood. Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59), 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester. The changes in body mass index at birth and in childhood were similar for children exposed and those not exposed to maternal smoking. However, from childhood to adolescence the rate of change in the body mass index was higher among those exposed only during pregnancy than among those who were not exposed. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to smoking only during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, seems to affect changes in the body mass index until adolescence, supporting guidelines that recommend women of childbearing age to stop smoking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Predicted means of body mass index from birth to adolescence, for exposure to maternal smoking adjusted for gender, socioeconomic position at preschool age, and breastfeeding.
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f02: Predicted means of body mass index from birth to adolescence, for exposure to maternal smoking adjusted for gender, socioeconomic position at preschool age, and breastfeeding.

Mentions: Therefore, the linear models indicated that in adolescence children exposed to smoking only during pregnancy showed a greater increase of the BMI, and this association was maintained even after adjusting for sex, economic class in childhood, and breastfeeding (Table 2). Furthermore, children exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy and early childhood showed lower increase of the BMI between childhood and adolescence than children not exposed (Figure 2), with borderline statistical significance (p = 0.09). Due to the shortage of information on the paternal smoking variable, it was not included in the main analysis, but a sensitivity analysis including paternal smoking into the multivariate model did not change the regression coefficient of association between maternal smoking and growth.


Effect of the exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood on the body mass index until adolescence.

Muraro AP, Gonçalves-Silva RM, Ferreira MG, Silva GA, Sichieri R - Rev Saude Publica (2015)

Predicted means of body mass index from birth to adolescence, for exposure to maternal smoking adjusted for gender, socioeconomic position at preschool age, and breastfeeding.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544362&req=5

f02: Predicted means of body mass index from birth to adolescence, for exposure to maternal smoking adjusted for gender, socioeconomic position at preschool age, and breastfeeding.
Mentions: Therefore, the linear models indicated that in adolescence children exposed to smoking only during pregnancy showed a greater increase of the BMI, and this association was maintained even after adjusting for sex, economic class in childhood, and breastfeeding (Table 2). Furthermore, children exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy and early childhood showed lower increase of the BMI between childhood and adolescence than children not exposed (Figure 2), with borderline statistical significance (p = 0.09). Due to the shortage of information on the paternal smoking variable, it was not included in the main analysis, but a sensitivity analysis including paternal smoking into the multivariate model did not change the regression coefficient of association between maternal smoking and growth.

Bottom Line: METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old) from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405).RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2%) also smoked during early childhood.Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59), 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Saúde Coletiva, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Cuiabá, MT, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE Investigate the effect of exposure to smoking during pregnancy and early childhood on changes in the body mass index (BMI) from birth to adolescence. METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old) from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405). Between 2009 and 2011, the cohort was re-evaluated. Information about birth weight was obtained from medical records, and exposure to smoking during pregnancy and childhood was assessed at the first interview. Linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the association between exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and preschool age, and the body mass index of children at birth, childhood and adolescence. RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2%) also smoked during early childhood. Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59), 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester. The changes in body mass index at birth and in childhood were similar for children exposed and those not exposed to maternal smoking. However, from childhood to adolescence the rate of change in the body mass index was higher among those exposed only during pregnancy than among those who were not exposed. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to smoking only during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, seems to affect changes in the body mass index until adolescence, supporting guidelines that recommend women of childbearing age to stop smoking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus