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Priming healthy eating. You can't prime all the people all of the time.

Forwood SE, Ahern AL, Hollands GJ, Ng YL, Marteau TM - Appetite (2015)

Bottom Line: In the context of a food purchasing environment filled with advertising and promotions, and an increased desire from policy makers to guide individuals toward choosing healthier foods, this study tests whether priming methods that use healthy food adverts to increase preference for healthier food generalize to a representative population.In Study 2, the effect of the prime did not generalize to a representative population.This study provides preliminary evidence that the effects of adverts on healthy eating choices depend on key individual traits (education level) and states (hunger), do not generalize to a broader population and have the potential to increase health inequalities arising from food choice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behaviour and Health Research Unit, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Sef26@cam.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Simple slope analysis illustrating the effects from the logistic regression models of the interaction between prime and hunger in Study 1 (A), and the three-way interactions between prime, hunger and education in Study 2 (B) (Simple slope analysis following Jeremy F. Dawson, 2013). For the current sample, one standard deviation below the mean in terms of education equates with up to 1 A-level, and one standard deviation above the mean with a first degree.
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f0010: Simple slope analysis illustrating the effects from the logistic regression models of the interaction between prime and hunger in Study 1 (A), and the three-way interactions between prime, hunger and education in Study 2 (B) (Simple slope analysis following Jeremy F. Dawson, 2013). For the current sample, one standard deviation below the mean in terms of education equates with up to 1 A-level, and one standard deviation above the mean with a first degree.

Mentions: However, consistent with Hypothesis 1, there was a significant interaction between hunger and prime on the number of fruits chosen in the food preference task. There was an overall effect of hunger, in that hunger reduced the odds of fruits being chosen (OR (95% CI) = 0.38 (0.25–0.56), p < 0.0001). Within the group of participants reporting some hunger, those in the prime condition were more likely to select fruits than those in the non-prime condition (OR (95% CI) = 2.29 (1.33–3.96), p = 0.003). The prime had no effect on participants who reported no hunger (OR (95% CI) = 1.11 (0.60–2.04), p = 0.736) (Table 2, Fig. 1).


Priming healthy eating. You can't prime all the people all of the time.

Forwood SE, Ahern AL, Hollands GJ, Ng YL, Marteau TM - Appetite (2015)

Simple slope analysis illustrating the effects from the logistic regression models of the interaction between prime and hunger in Study 1 (A), and the three-way interactions between prime, hunger and education in Study 2 (B) (Simple slope analysis following Jeremy F. Dawson, 2013). For the current sample, one standard deviation below the mean in terms of education equates with up to 1 A-level, and one standard deviation above the mean with a first degree.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544036&req=5

f0010: Simple slope analysis illustrating the effects from the logistic regression models of the interaction between prime and hunger in Study 1 (A), and the three-way interactions between prime, hunger and education in Study 2 (B) (Simple slope analysis following Jeremy F. Dawson, 2013). For the current sample, one standard deviation below the mean in terms of education equates with up to 1 A-level, and one standard deviation above the mean with a first degree.
Mentions: However, consistent with Hypothesis 1, there was a significant interaction between hunger and prime on the number of fruits chosen in the food preference task. There was an overall effect of hunger, in that hunger reduced the odds of fruits being chosen (OR (95% CI) = 0.38 (0.25–0.56), p < 0.0001). Within the group of participants reporting some hunger, those in the prime condition were more likely to select fruits than those in the non-prime condition (OR (95% CI) = 2.29 (1.33–3.96), p = 0.003). The prime had no effect on participants who reported no hunger (OR (95% CI) = 1.11 (0.60–2.04), p = 0.736) (Table 2, Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: In the context of a food purchasing environment filled with advertising and promotions, and an increased desire from policy makers to guide individuals toward choosing healthier foods, this study tests whether priming methods that use healthy food adverts to increase preference for healthier food generalize to a representative population.In Study 2, the effect of the prime did not generalize to a representative population.This study provides preliminary evidence that the effects of adverts on healthy eating choices depend on key individual traits (education level) and states (hunger), do not generalize to a broader population and have the potential to increase health inequalities arising from food choice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behaviour and Health Research Unit, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Sef26@cam.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus