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Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

O'Regan BJ, Wang Y, Krauss TF - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane.At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18.A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics &Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Optical and electron micrograph images of the fabricated thermal emitter device.(a) Top-down view of the fabricated device. The image shows the deposited aluminium contact pads on both sides of the PhC structure along with the isolation trench around the entire device. (b) SEM image of the PhC structure, showing missing rows of holes in the vertical direction for the support ridges and the gaps in the horizontal direction to allow for thermal expansion of the crystal area. (c) SEM image showing the PhC slab suspended above the substrate. (d) Zoomed-in SEM image showing the oxide support ridge beneath the PhC slab.
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f2: Optical and electron micrograph images of the fabricated thermal emitter device.(a) Top-down view of the fabricated device. The image shows the deposited aluminium contact pads on both sides of the PhC structure along with the isolation trench around the entire device. (b) SEM image of the PhC structure, showing missing rows of holes in the vertical direction for the support ridges and the gaps in the horizontal direction to allow for thermal expansion of the crystal area. (c) SEM image showing the PhC slab suspended above the substrate. (d) Zoomed-in SEM image showing the oxide support ridge beneath the PhC slab.

Mentions: The PhC structure consists of a two dimensional (2D) square array of holes, which was generated by electron beam lithography using the positive e-beam resist AR-P 6200.09 (ALLRESIST, Germany) at a thickness of 350 nm. The pattern was transferred into the silicon layer by dry etching using a reactive ion etcher with a gas ratio of SF6:CHF3 = 1.00:1.16. Isolation trenches around the device and around the aluminium contact pads were added to provide better electrical isolation. Aluminium contacts were deposited using thermal evaporation. Finally, to improve thermal isolation and to enable high temperature operation, the buried oxide layer beneath the silicon PhC layer was removed using a mixture of hydrofluoric (HF) acid and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) (HF:NH4F = 1.0:4.8) in order to create a free-standing silicon membrane. Figure 2(a) shows an optical micrograph of the fabricated device. The image shows the deposited aluminium contact pads at both sides of the PhC structure along with the isolation trench around the entire device.


Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

O'Regan BJ, Wang Y, Krauss TF - Sci Rep (2015)

Optical and electron micrograph images of the fabricated thermal emitter device.(a) Top-down view of the fabricated device. The image shows the deposited aluminium contact pads on both sides of the PhC structure along with the isolation trench around the entire device. (b) SEM image of the PhC structure, showing missing rows of holes in the vertical direction for the support ridges and the gaps in the horizontal direction to allow for thermal expansion of the crystal area. (c) SEM image showing the PhC slab suspended above the substrate. (d) Zoomed-in SEM image showing the oxide support ridge beneath the PhC slab.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544018&req=5

f2: Optical and electron micrograph images of the fabricated thermal emitter device.(a) Top-down view of the fabricated device. The image shows the deposited aluminium contact pads on both sides of the PhC structure along with the isolation trench around the entire device. (b) SEM image of the PhC structure, showing missing rows of holes in the vertical direction for the support ridges and the gaps in the horizontal direction to allow for thermal expansion of the crystal area. (c) SEM image showing the PhC slab suspended above the substrate. (d) Zoomed-in SEM image showing the oxide support ridge beneath the PhC slab.
Mentions: The PhC structure consists of a two dimensional (2D) square array of holes, which was generated by electron beam lithography using the positive e-beam resist AR-P 6200.09 (ALLRESIST, Germany) at a thickness of 350 nm. The pattern was transferred into the silicon layer by dry etching using a reactive ion etcher with a gas ratio of SF6:CHF3 = 1.00:1.16. Isolation trenches around the device and around the aluminium contact pads were added to provide better electrical isolation. Aluminium contacts were deposited using thermal evaporation. Finally, to improve thermal isolation and to enable high temperature operation, the buried oxide layer beneath the silicon PhC layer was removed using a mixture of hydrofluoric (HF) acid and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) (HF:NH4F = 1.0:4.8) in order to create a free-standing silicon membrane. Figure 2(a) shows an optical micrograph of the fabricated device. The image shows the deposited aluminium contact pads at both sides of the PhC structure along with the isolation trench around the entire device.

Bottom Line: The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane.At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18.A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics &Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus