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Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

O'Regan BJ, Wang Y, Krauss TF - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane.At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18.A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics &Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the thermal emitter device.The device consists of a n-type doped silicon layer on an SOI wafer, with the PhC structure in the centre and aluminium contact pads for current injection at each side. The inset illustrates a cross sectional view of the device and shows the membraned PhC structure supported on ridges of oxide, which allows for fabrication of large area PhC slabs.
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f1: Schematic of the thermal emitter device.The device consists of a n-type doped silicon layer on an SOI wafer, with the PhC structure in the centre and aluminium contact pads for current injection at each side. The inset illustrates a cross sectional view of the device and shows the membraned PhC structure supported on ridges of oxide, which allows for fabrication of large area PhC slabs.

Mentions: The thermal emitter device consists of a PhC structure etched into the highly doped, 220 nm thick silicon membrane of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer (SOITEC). Figure 1 shows a schematic of the device, with a cross sectional view of the PhC illustrated in the inset. We apply an electrical bias across the PhC via external aluminium contact pads to resistively heat the membrane. The first step in fabricating the device is to dope the 220 nm thick silicon device layer, which sits on top of a 2 μm layer of buried oxide. As a starting point, we chose a relatively high doping concentration in the 1020 cm−3 regime. We used solid source diffusion method (Phosphorus Grade PH-950, Saint-Gobain Ceramics, USA) in a furnace with a nitrogen environment at 1000 °C for 45 mins. According to reference [16] for a n-type doping concentration of ≈2.5 × 1020 cm−3, it results in an absorption coefficient of 4700 cm−1 and a refractive index of 3.31 around 1.4 μm.


Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

O'Regan BJ, Wang Y, Krauss TF - Sci Rep (2015)

Schematic of the thermal emitter device.The device consists of a n-type doped silicon layer on an SOI wafer, with the PhC structure in the centre and aluminium contact pads for current injection at each side. The inset illustrates a cross sectional view of the device and shows the membraned PhC structure supported on ridges of oxide, which allows for fabrication of large area PhC slabs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544018&req=5

f1: Schematic of the thermal emitter device.The device consists of a n-type doped silicon layer on an SOI wafer, with the PhC structure in the centre and aluminium contact pads for current injection at each side. The inset illustrates a cross sectional view of the device and shows the membraned PhC structure supported on ridges of oxide, which allows for fabrication of large area PhC slabs.
Mentions: The thermal emitter device consists of a PhC structure etched into the highly doped, 220 nm thick silicon membrane of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer (SOITEC). Figure 1 shows a schematic of the device, with a cross sectional view of the PhC illustrated in the inset. We apply an electrical bias across the PhC via external aluminium contact pads to resistively heat the membrane. The first step in fabricating the device is to dope the 220 nm thick silicon device layer, which sits on top of a 2 μm layer of buried oxide. As a starting point, we chose a relatively high doping concentration in the 1020 cm−3 regime. We used solid source diffusion method (Phosphorus Grade PH-950, Saint-Gobain Ceramics, USA) in a furnace with a nitrogen environment at 1000 °C for 45 mins. According to reference [16] for a n-type doping concentration of ≈2.5 × 1020 cm−3, it results in an absorption coefficient of 4700 cm−1 and a refractive index of 3.31 around 1.4 μm.

Bottom Line: The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane.At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18.A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics &Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus