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High-frequency hearing, tinnitus, and patient satisfaction with stapedotomy: A randomized prospective study.

Bagger-Sjöbäck D, Strömbäck K, Hultcrantz M, Papatziamos G, Smeds H, Danckwardt-Lillieström N, Tideholm B, Johansson A, Hellström S, Hakizimana P, Fridberger A - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Young patients were significantly more likely to experience reduction of tinnitus and patients whose tinnitus became better were also more satisfied with the outcome of the operation.These findings have practical importance for patients and their surgeons.Young patients can be advised that surgery is likely to be beneficial for their tinnitus, but a less positive message should be conveyed to older patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Otosclerosis is a common disorder that leads to conductive hearing loss. Most patients with otosclerosis also have tinnitus, and surgical treatment is known to improve hearing as well as tinnitus. Some patients however experience worsening of tinnitus after the operation, but there are no known factors that allow surgeons to predict who will be at risk. In this prospective observational study on 133 patients undergoing stapedotomy, we show that postoperative air conduction thresholds at very high stimulus frequencies predict improvement of tinnitus, as assessed with proportional odds logistic regression models. Young patients were significantly more likely to experience reduction of tinnitus and patients whose tinnitus became better were also more satisfied with the outcome of the operation. These findings have practical importance for patients and their surgeons. Young patients can be advised that surgery is likely to be beneficial for their tinnitus, but a less positive message should be conveyed to older patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CONSORT flow diagram.Randomization took place before surgery. Patients returned for follow-up visits 6 to 8 weeks and one year after surgery. The numbers given refer to patients completing the entire study.
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f1: CONSORT flow diagram.Randomization took place before surgery. Patients returned for follow-up visits 6 to 8 weeks and one year after surgery. The numbers given refer to patients completing the entire study.

Mentions: Starting in November 2007 and ending in April 2012, 605 patients with otosclerosis were assessed for eligibility (Fig. 1; the main eligibility criteria were otosclerosis where surgical treatment was planned, air-bone gap exceeding 20 dB across the frequencies 0.5 to 3 kHz, and age >18 years). From these potentially eligible subjects, 26% fulfilled inclusion criteria and were willing to participate in the trial. A common reason for declining participation was that patients lived far from the clinic and were unwilling to travel; some patients also declined to participate in high-frequency audiometry because of the extra time needed for hearing measurements. A total of 135 patients provided high-frequency audiometry data 6 weeks after surgery and 133 did so at one year (70 patients in the N-Acetylcysteine group, 63 in the placebo group).


High-frequency hearing, tinnitus, and patient satisfaction with stapedotomy: A randomized prospective study.

Bagger-Sjöbäck D, Strömbäck K, Hultcrantz M, Papatziamos G, Smeds H, Danckwardt-Lillieström N, Tideholm B, Johansson A, Hellström S, Hakizimana P, Fridberger A - Sci Rep (2015)

CONSORT flow diagram.Randomization took place before surgery. Patients returned for follow-up visits 6 to 8 weeks and one year after surgery. The numbers given refer to patients completing the entire study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4544016&req=5

f1: CONSORT flow diagram.Randomization took place before surgery. Patients returned for follow-up visits 6 to 8 weeks and one year after surgery. The numbers given refer to patients completing the entire study.
Mentions: Starting in November 2007 and ending in April 2012, 605 patients with otosclerosis were assessed for eligibility (Fig. 1; the main eligibility criteria were otosclerosis where surgical treatment was planned, air-bone gap exceeding 20 dB across the frequencies 0.5 to 3 kHz, and age >18 years). From these potentially eligible subjects, 26% fulfilled inclusion criteria and were willing to participate in the trial. A common reason for declining participation was that patients lived far from the clinic and were unwilling to travel; some patients also declined to participate in high-frequency audiometry because of the extra time needed for hearing measurements. A total of 135 patients provided high-frequency audiometry data 6 weeks after surgery and 133 did so at one year (70 patients in the N-Acetylcysteine group, 63 in the placebo group).

Bottom Line: Young patients were significantly more likely to experience reduction of tinnitus and patients whose tinnitus became better were also more satisfied with the outcome of the operation.These findings have practical importance for patients and their surgeons.Young patients can be advised that surgery is likely to be beneficial for their tinnitus, but a less positive message should be conveyed to older patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Otosclerosis is a common disorder that leads to conductive hearing loss. Most patients with otosclerosis also have tinnitus, and surgical treatment is known to improve hearing as well as tinnitus. Some patients however experience worsening of tinnitus after the operation, but there are no known factors that allow surgeons to predict who will be at risk. In this prospective observational study on 133 patients undergoing stapedotomy, we show that postoperative air conduction thresholds at very high stimulus frequencies predict improvement of tinnitus, as assessed with proportional odds logistic regression models. Young patients were significantly more likely to experience reduction of tinnitus and patients whose tinnitus became better were also more satisfied with the outcome of the operation. These findings have practical importance for patients and their surgeons. Young patients can be advised that surgery is likely to be beneficial for their tinnitus, but a less positive message should be conveyed to older patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus