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Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period.

Nakajima K, Kitayama T, Hayashi H, Matsuda M, Sataka M, Tsujimoto M, Toulemonde M, Bouffard S, Kimura K - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies.Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position.The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

No MeSH data available.


Result of the calculation of the i-TS model for a-SiO2 irradiated with 420 MeV Au ions.The energy deposited on the target atoms is shown as a function of time at different radial distances from the projectile trajectory. The horizontal line indicates the threshold energy for desorption of gold nanoparticles.
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f5: Result of the calculation of the i-TS model for a-SiO2 irradiated with 420 MeV Au ions.The energy deposited on the target atoms is shown as a function of time at different radial distances from the projectile trajectory. The horizontal line indicates the threshold energy for desorption of gold nanoparticles.

Mentions: With the above mentioned parameters, the evolution of the temperature distribution around the ion impact position was calculated using the i-TS model. Figure 5 shows the result of a-SiO2. The horizontal line indicates the threshold energy for desorption (Ed = 0.4 eV/atom16). The energy deposited on the atoms exceeds the threshold energy when the distance from the impact position r is smaller than 7 nm. This local heating continues for more than picosecond. The similar calculation was performed for the a-SiN irradiated with the 420 MeV Au ion. The obtained critical radius within which the deposited energy exceeds the threshold energy for desorption is 7.6 nm. These calculated critical radii are roughly in agreement with the observed nanoparticle cleared radii R, indicating that the i-TS model reproduces the temperature distribution during the track formation. It is also noteworthy that i-TS calculation also reproduces the observed track radius. From Fig. 5, it can be seen that the energy deposited on atoms exceeds the energy to boil (1.7 eV/atom for a-SiO217) and the energy to melt (0.38 eV/atom17) at r smaller than 1.7 and 7.2 nm, respectively. These radii are in good agreement with the observed track core and shell radius, 1.6 ± 0.3 nm and 6 ± 1 nm, respectively, for a-SiO2.


Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period.

Nakajima K, Kitayama T, Hayashi H, Matsuda M, Sataka M, Tsujimoto M, Toulemonde M, Bouffard S, Kimura K - Sci Rep (2015)

Result of the calculation of the i-TS model for a-SiO2 irradiated with 420 MeV Au ions.The energy deposited on the target atoms is shown as a function of time at different radial distances from the projectile trajectory. The horizontal line indicates the threshold energy for desorption of gold nanoparticles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543984&req=5

f5: Result of the calculation of the i-TS model for a-SiO2 irradiated with 420 MeV Au ions.The energy deposited on the target atoms is shown as a function of time at different radial distances from the projectile trajectory. The horizontal line indicates the threshold energy for desorption of gold nanoparticles.
Mentions: With the above mentioned parameters, the evolution of the temperature distribution around the ion impact position was calculated using the i-TS model. Figure 5 shows the result of a-SiO2. The horizontal line indicates the threshold energy for desorption (Ed = 0.4 eV/atom16). The energy deposited on the atoms exceeds the threshold energy when the distance from the impact position r is smaller than 7 nm. This local heating continues for more than picosecond. The similar calculation was performed for the a-SiN irradiated with the 420 MeV Au ion. The obtained critical radius within which the deposited energy exceeds the threshold energy for desorption is 7.6 nm. These calculated critical radii are roughly in agreement with the observed nanoparticle cleared radii R, indicating that the i-TS model reproduces the temperature distribution during the track formation. It is also noteworthy that i-TS calculation also reproduces the observed track radius. From Fig. 5, it can be seen that the energy deposited on atoms exceeds the energy to boil (1.7 eV/atom for a-SiO217) and the energy to melt (0.38 eV/atom17) at r smaller than 1.7 and 7.2 nm, respectively. These radii are in good agreement with the observed track core and shell radius, 1.6 ± 0.3 nm and 6 ± 1 nm, respectively, for a-SiO2.

Bottom Line: This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies.Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position.The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

No MeSH data available.