Limits...
Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period.

Nakajima K, Kitayama T, Hayashi H, Matsuda M, Sataka M, Tsujimoto M, Toulemonde M, Bouffard S, Kimura K - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies.Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position.The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

No MeSH data available.


Distributions of the distance between the ion track and the closest gold nanoparticle.The results for the irradiation of a-SiO2 with 420 MeV Au ions on the front surface (solid circles) and on the rear surface (open circles) are shown. The results of a-SiN are also shown by solid triangles (front surface irradiation) and open triangles (rear surface irradiation). The arrows show the average distances. The dashed lines show the results of Gaussian fitting. The solid line shows the calculated distribution if nanoparticles are not desorbed by the ion impact (see text).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543984&req=5

f4: Distributions of the distance between the ion track and the closest gold nanoparticle.The results for the irradiation of a-SiO2 with 420 MeV Au ions on the front surface (solid circles) and on the rear surface (open circles) are shown. The results of a-SiN are also shown by solid triangles (front surface irradiation) and open triangles (rear surface irradiation). The arrows show the average distances. The dashed lines show the results of Gaussian fitting. The solid line shows the calculated distribution if nanoparticles are not desorbed by the ion impact (see text).

Mentions: Looking at the vicinity of the ion track closely (Fig. 1(b)), the gold nanoparticles seem to disappear from the surrounding area of the ion tracks. Such disappearance of the gold nanoparticles was also observed for the front surface irradiation. The distance between the ion track and the closest gold nanoparticle was measured for each ion track. The observed closest distance, Rc, represents the radius of the region where nanoparticles disappeared. The distributions of the measured closest distances for the samples irradiated on the front surface (solid circles) and the rear surface (open circles) are shown in Fig. 4. The average of the closest distance, <Rc>, is 6.3 ± 0.6 and 7.2 ± 0.7 nm for the front and rear surface irradiations, respectively. This suggests that 2.4 and 3.1 nanoparticles, on average, are removed by single Au ion impact. In order to confirm this, the distribution of closest distance was calculated assuming that there was no removal of nanoparticles around the ion tracks. The probability that the closest nanoparticle is found in a region [Rc, Rc + dRc] is given byif the gold nanoparticles are not desorbed by the ion irradiation. The distribution was calculated with the observed N (1.9 × 1012  particles/cm2) and shown by a solid line in Fig. 4. The calculated distribution has a peak at a distance of ~3 nm, which is much smaller than the observed ones (6.3 and 7.2 nm). This clearly indicates that nanoparticles are really removed from the vicinity of the ion impact position.


Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period.

Nakajima K, Kitayama T, Hayashi H, Matsuda M, Sataka M, Tsujimoto M, Toulemonde M, Bouffard S, Kimura K - Sci Rep (2015)

Distributions of the distance between the ion track and the closest gold nanoparticle.The results for the irradiation of a-SiO2 with 420 MeV Au ions on the front surface (solid circles) and on the rear surface (open circles) are shown. The results of a-SiN are also shown by solid triangles (front surface irradiation) and open triangles (rear surface irradiation). The arrows show the average distances. The dashed lines show the results of Gaussian fitting. The solid line shows the calculated distribution if nanoparticles are not desorbed by the ion impact (see text).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543984&req=5

f4: Distributions of the distance between the ion track and the closest gold nanoparticle.The results for the irradiation of a-SiO2 with 420 MeV Au ions on the front surface (solid circles) and on the rear surface (open circles) are shown. The results of a-SiN are also shown by solid triangles (front surface irradiation) and open triangles (rear surface irradiation). The arrows show the average distances. The dashed lines show the results of Gaussian fitting. The solid line shows the calculated distribution if nanoparticles are not desorbed by the ion impact (see text).
Mentions: Looking at the vicinity of the ion track closely (Fig. 1(b)), the gold nanoparticles seem to disappear from the surrounding area of the ion tracks. Such disappearance of the gold nanoparticles was also observed for the front surface irradiation. The distance between the ion track and the closest gold nanoparticle was measured for each ion track. The observed closest distance, Rc, represents the radius of the region where nanoparticles disappeared. The distributions of the measured closest distances for the samples irradiated on the front surface (solid circles) and the rear surface (open circles) are shown in Fig. 4. The average of the closest distance, <Rc>, is 6.3 ± 0.6 and 7.2 ± 0.7 nm for the front and rear surface irradiations, respectively. This suggests that 2.4 and 3.1 nanoparticles, on average, are removed by single Au ion impact. In order to confirm this, the distribution of closest distance was calculated assuming that there was no removal of nanoparticles around the ion tracks. The probability that the closest nanoparticle is found in a region [Rc, Rc + dRc] is given byif the gold nanoparticles are not desorbed by the ion irradiation. The distribution was calculated with the observed N (1.9 × 1012  particles/cm2) and shown by a solid line in Fig. 4. The calculated distribution has a peak at a distance of ~3 nm, which is much smaller than the observed ones (6.3 and 7.2 nm). This clearly indicates that nanoparticles are really removed from the vicinity of the ion impact position.

Bottom Line: This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies.Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position.The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

No MeSH data available.