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Prevention of enamel demineralization with a novel fluoride strip: enamel surface composition and depth profile.

Lee BS, Chou PH, Chen SY, Liao HY, Chang CC - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Fluoride infiltrated extensively in enamel to produce highly fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite.In comparison, low-fluoride-level fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite was formed on the enamel specimen exposed to toothpaste.It exhibited the potential as an effective fluoride delivery device for general use in prevention of caries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, No.1, Changde St., Jhongjheng District, Taipei 100, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
There is no topically applicable low concentration fluoride delivery device available for caries prevention. This study was aimed to assess the use of a low concentration (1450 ppm) fluoride strip as an effective fluoride delivery system against enamel demineralization. The enamel surface composition and calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite or toothpaste treatments were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In vitro enamel demineralization was assayed using a pH cycling model and the dissolution of calcium ions from the treated specimens was quantified using ion chromatography. After 24-hr fluoride-strip treatment, the enamel was covered with a CaF2 layer which showed a granular morphology of 1 μm in size. Below the CaF2 layer was a region of mixed fluorapatite and CaF2. Fluoride infiltrated extensively in enamel to produce highly fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite. In comparison, low-fluoride-level fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite was formed on the enamel specimen exposed to toothpaste. The treatments with the fluoride strip as short as 1 hr significantly inhibited enamel demineralization. The fluoride strip was effective for topical fluoride delivery and inhibited in vitro demineralization of enamel by forming CaF2 and fluoride-containing apatites at the enamel surface. It exhibited the potential as an effective fluoride delivery device for general use in prevention of caries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of the experimental design.
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f1: Flowchart of the experimental design.

Mentions: Shallow lesions were formed on the enamel specimens in a two-layer system of 8% methyl cellulose gel and 0.1 M lactic acid adjusted to pH 4.6 for 7 days18. The enamel specimens were submitted to pH cycles including demineralizing, rinse, remineralizing, and rinse solutions for 3 days at 37 oC19. Each specimen was cycled in 4 ml of the three solutions. Six 3-hour cycles each day were programmed with 1 h in demineralizing solution containing 1.5 mM CaCl2, 0.9 mM KH2PO4 and 50 mM acetic acid adjusted to pH 4.8. They were then stored in rinse solution containing 1.5 mM CaCl2, 0.9 mM KH2PO4, 130 mM KCl at pH 7.0 for 5 s. Subsequently, the specimens were immersed in a remineralizing solution containing 1.5 mM CaCl2, 0.9 mM KH2PO4, 130 mM KCl, and 20 mM HEPES, pH 7.0 for 2 h. They were then rinsed again as described before. The specimens were immersed in remineralization solution for the remaining 6 h (Fig. 1). The initial 3 days of pH cycling were used to calculate the baseline calcium uptake and loss of each specimen20.


Prevention of enamel demineralization with a novel fluoride strip: enamel surface composition and depth profile.

Lee BS, Chou PH, Chen SY, Liao HY, Chang CC - Sci Rep (2015)

Flowchart of the experimental design.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543969&req=5

f1: Flowchart of the experimental design.
Mentions: Shallow lesions were formed on the enamel specimens in a two-layer system of 8% methyl cellulose gel and 0.1 M lactic acid adjusted to pH 4.6 for 7 days18. The enamel specimens were submitted to pH cycles including demineralizing, rinse, remineralizing, and rinse solutions for 3 days at 37 oC19. Each specimen was cycled in 4 ml of the three solutions. Six 3-hour cycles each day were programmed with 1 h in demineralizing solution containing 1.5 mM CaCl2, 0.9 mM KH2PO4 and 50 mM acetic acid adjusted to pH 4.8. They were then stored in rinse solution containing 1.5 mM CaCl2, 0.9 mM KH2PO4, 130 mM KCl at pH 7.0 for 5 s. Subsequently, the specimens were immersed in a remineralizing solution containing 1.5 mM CaCl2, 0.9 mM KH2PO4, 130 mM KCl, and 20 mM HEPES, pH 7.0 for 2 h. They were then rinsed again as described before. The specimens were immersed in remineralization solution for the remaining 6 h (Fig. 1). The initial 3 days of pH cycling were used to calculate the baseline calcium uptake and loss of each specimen20.

Bottom Line: Fluoride infiltrated extensively in enamel to produce highly fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite.In comparison, low-fluoride-level fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite was formed on the enamel specimen exposed to toothpaste.It exhibited the potential as an effective fluoride delivery device for general use in prevention of caries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, No.1, Changde St., Jhongjheng District, Taipei 100, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
There is no topically applicable low concentration fluoride delivery device available for caries prevention. This study was aimed to assess the use of a low concentration (1450 ppm) fluoride strip as an effective fluoride delivery system against enamel demineralization. The enamel surface composition and calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite or toothpaste treatments were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In vitro enamel demineralization was assayed using a pH cycling model and the dissolution of calcium ions from the treated specimens was quantified using ion chromatography. After 24-hr fluoride-strip treatment, the enamel was covered with a CaF2 layer which showed a granular morphology of 1 μm in size. Below the CaF2 layer was a region of mixed fluorapatite and CaF2. Fluoride infiltrated extensively in enamel to produce highly fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite. In comparison, low-fluoride-level fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite was formed on the enamel specimen exposed to toothpaste. The treatments with the fluoride strip as short as 1 hr significantly inhibited enamel demineralization. The fluoride strip was effective for topical fluoride delivery and inhibited in vitro demineralization of enamel by forming CaF2 and fluoride-containing apatites at the enamel surface. It exhibited the potential as an effective fluoride delivery device for general use in prevention of caries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus