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Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips.

Lima RS, Leão PA, Piazzetta MH, Monteiro AM, Shiroma LY, Gobbi AL, Carrilho E - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests.Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature.Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Microfabricação, Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-970, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM-FEG micrographies of the cross-section of microchannels obtained by SAB for two methods of SU-8 development: prior to its cure (a) and after its cure outside the microchannel (b). R, SU-8.
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f6: SEM-FEG micrographies of the cross-section of microchannels obtained by SAB for two methods of SU-8 development: prior to its cure (a) and after its cure outside the microchannel (b). R, SU-8.

Mentions: Figure 6 shows micrographies of the cross-section of the bonded microchannel for the two methods of SU-8 film development in SAB discussed above. Figure 6(a) presents the excessive removal of adhesive when the development step is performed before its cure. In this case, PGMEA was pumped for 10 s at 5 μL min−1 for development of SU-8. Conversely, Fig. 6(b) illustrates the removal of the adhesive layer just under the microfluidic channel by using Al thin film as a mask. This mask allowed the resist removal after the selective cure around the microchannel during UV exposure. The procedure was conducted for 40 s at 20 μL min−1 of PGMEA.


Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips.

Lima RS, Leão PA, Piazzetta MH, Monteiro AM, Shiroma LY, Gobbi AL, Carrilho E - Sci Rep (2015)

SEM-FEG micrographies of the cross-section of microchannels obtained by SAB for two methods of SU-8 development: prior to its cure (a) and after its cure outside the microchannel (b). R, SU-8.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543966&req=5

f6: SEM-FEG micrographies of the cross-section of microchannels obtained by SAB for two methods of SU-8 development: prior to its cure (a) and after its cure outside the microchannel (b). R, SU-8.
Mentions: Figure 6 shows micrographies of the cross-section of the bonded microchannel for the two methods of SU-8 film development in SAB discussed above. Figure 6(a) presents the excessive removal of adhesive when the development step is performed before its cure. In this case, PGMEA was pumped for 10 s at 5 μL min−1 for development of SU-8. Conversely, Fig. 6(b) illustrates the removal of the adhesive layer just under the microfluidic channel by using Al thin film as a mask. This mask allowed the resist removal after the selective cure around the microchannel during UV exposure. The procedure was conducted for 40 s at 20 μL min−1 of PGMEA.

Bottom Line: This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests.Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature.Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Microfabricação, Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-970, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus