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Age-related deficit in a bimanual joint position matching task is amplitude dependent.

Boisgontier MP, Swinnen SP - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: The cognitive load associated with joint position sense increases with age but does not necessarily result in impaired performance in a joint position matching task.Results revealed an age-related deficit when the target limb was positioned far from (25°) the neutral position, but not when close to (15°, 5°) the neutral joint position, irrespective of the direction.These results suggest that the difficulty associated with the comparison of two musculoskeletal states increases towards extreme joint amplitude and that older adults are more vulnerable to this increased difficulty.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, Biomedical Sciences Group, KU Leuven Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The cognitive load associated with joint position sense increases with age but does not necessarily result in impaired performance in a joint position matching task. It is still unclear which factors interact with age to predict matching performance. To test whether movement amplitude and direction are part of such predictors, young and older adults performed a bimanual wrist joint position matching task. Results revealed an age-related deficit when the target limb was positioned far from (25°) the neutral position, but not when close to (15°, 5°) the neutral joint position, irrespective of the direction. These results suggest that the difficulty associated with the comparison of two musculoskeletal states increases towards extreme joint amplitude and that older adults are more vulnerable to this increased difficulty.

No MeSH data available.


Total error as a function of the amplitude of the target position in young and older adults. *indicates significant difference.
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Figure 1: Total error as a function of the amplitude of the target position in young and older adults. *indicates significant difference.

Mentions: The three-way ANOVA demonstrated a significant main effect of Amplitude [F(2,112) = 5.06; p = 0.008; = 0.08] with greater total error in the 25-degrees than 5-degrees condition (p = 0.011). Main effects of Age [F(1,56) = 2.75; p = 0.103; = 0.05] and Direction [F(1,56) = 0.90; p = 0.348; = 0.02] were not significant. The Age × Amplitude interaction was significant [F(2,112) = 5.39; p = 0.006; = 0.09; Figure 1] but not the Age × Direction [F(1,56) = 0.28; p = 0.600; < 0.01] and three-way interaction [F(2,112) = 0.37; p = 0.693; < 0.01]. Post hoc analyses revealed an age-related total error increase in the 25-degrees condition (p = 0.049) but not in the other amplitude conditions (p > 0.692; Figure 1).


Age-related deficit in a bimanual joint position matching task is amplitude dependent.

Boisgontier MP, Swinnen SP - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Total error as a function of the amplitude of the target position in young and older adults. *indicates significant difference.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543861&req=5

Figure 1: Total error as a function of the amplitude of the target position in young and older adults. *indicates significant difference.
Mentions: The three-way ANOVA demonstrated a significant main effect of Amplitude [F(2,112) = 5.06; p = 0.008; = 0.08] with greater total error in the 25-degrees than 5-degrees condition (p = 0.011). Main effects of Age [F(1,56) = 2.75; p = 0.103; = 0.05] and Direction [F(1,56) = 0.90; p = 0.348; = 0.02] were not significant. The Age × Amplitude interaction was significant [F(2,112) = 5.39; p = 0.006; = 0.09; Figure 1] but not the Age × Direction [F(1,56) = 0.28; p = 0.600; < 0.01] and three-way interaction [F(2,112) = 0.37; p = 0.693; < 0.01]. Post hoc analyses revealed an age-related total error increase in the 25-degrees condition (p = 0.049) but not in the other amplitude conditions (p > 0.692; Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The cognitive load associated with joint position sense increases with age but does not necessarily result in impaired performance in a joint position matching task.Results revealed an age-related deficit when the target limb was positioned far from (25°) the neutral position, but not when close to (15°, 5°) the neutral joint position, irrespective of the direction.These results suggest that the difficulty associated with the comparison of two musculoskeletal states increases towards extreme joint amplitude and that older adults are more vulnerable to this increased difficulty.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, Biomedical Sciences Group, KU Leuven Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The cognitive load associated with joint position sense increases with age but does not necessarily result in impaired performance in a joint position matching task. It is still unclear which factors interact with age to predict matching performance. To test whether movement amplitude and direction are part of such predictors, young and older adults performed a bimanual wrist joint position matching task. Results revealed an age-related deficit when the target limb was positioned far from (25°) the neutral position, but not when close to (15°, 5°) the neutral joint position, irrespective of the direction. These results suggest that the difficulty associated with the comparison of two musculoskeletal states increases towards extreme joint amplitude and that older adults are more vulnerable to this increased difficulty.

No MeSH data available.