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On the particular vulnerability of face recognition to aging: a review of three hypotheses.

Boutet I, Taler V, Collin CA - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults.We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition.Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa , Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Age-related face recognition deficits are characterized by high false alarms to unfamiliar faces, are not as pronounced for other complex stimuli, and are only partially related to general age-related impairments in cognition. This paper reviews some of the underlying processes likely to be implicated in theses deficits by focusing on areas where contradictions abound as a means to highlight avenues for future research. Research pertaining to the three following hypotheses is presented: (i) perceptual deterioration, (ii) encoding of configural information, and (iii) difficulties in recollecting contextual information. The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults. We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition. Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An example of the composite effect. The top row shows two unmodified faces (A,B). The middle row shows a stimulus composed of the top half of b and the bottom half of a in an aligned condition (D) or a misaligned condition (D). Recognition of the individual faces that make up the composite is significantly less accurate in the aligned composite (C) than the misaligned non-composite (D). This difference is less pronounced when the images are inverted (E,F). This is taken as evidence that faces are normally processed holistically, but that inversion disrupts this holistic processing.
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Figure 3: An example of the composite effect. The top row shows two unmodified faces (A,B). The middle row shows a stimulus composed of the top half of b and the bottom half of a in an aligned condition (D) or a misaligned condition (D). Recognition of the individual faces that make up the composite is significantly less accurate in the aligned composite (C) than the misaligned non-composite (D). This difference is less pronounced when the images are inverted (E,F). This is taken as evidence that faces are normally processed holistically, but that inversion disrupts this holistic processing.

Mentions: The composite effect (Young et al., 1987) and the whole-part advantage (Tanaka and Farah, 1993) have been used to investigate holistic face processing. The composite effect refers to the finding that composites made of two aligned half faces are more difficult to recognize than non-composites made of two misaligned face halves (Figure 3). The whole-part advantage refers to the finding that recognition of facial features is easier when they are presented in full faces rather than in isolation. Both these differences are reduced when faces are inverted, suggesting that recognition of upright faces is performed on the basis of a unitary holistic representation and that formation of this representation is impaired by inversion.


On the particular vulnerability of face recognition to aging: a review of three hypotheses.

Boutet I, Taler V, Collin CA - Front Psychol (2015)

An example of the composite effect. The top row shows two unmodified faces (A,B). The middle row shows a stimulus composed of the top half of b and the bottom half of a in an aligned condition (D) or a misaligned condition (D). Recognition of the individual faces that make up the composite is significantly less accurate in the aligned composite (C) than the misaligned non-composite (D). This difference is less pronounced when the images are inverted (E,F). This is taken as evidence that faces are normally processed holistically, but that inversion disrupts this holistic processing.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543816&req=5

Figure 3: An example of the composite effect. The top row shows two unmodified faces (A,B). The middle row shows a stimulus composed of the top half of b and the bottom half of a in an aligned condition (D) or a misaligned condition (D). Recognition of the individual faces that make up the composite is significantly less accurate in the aligned composite (C) than the misaligned non-composite (D). This difference is less pronounced when the images are inverted (E,F). This is taken as evidence that faces are normally processed holistically, but that inversion disrupts this holistic processing.
Mentions: The composite effect (Young et al., 1987) and the whole-part advantage (Tanaka and Farah, 1993) have been used to investigate holistic face processing. The composite effect refers to the finding that composites made of two aligned half faces are more difficult to recognize than non-composites made of two misaligned face halves (Figure 3). The whole-part advantage refers to the finding that recognition of facial features is easier when they are presented in full faces rather than in isolation. Both these differences are reduced when faces are inverted, suggesting that recognition of upright faces is performed on the basis of a unitary holistic representation and that formation of this representation is impaired by inversion.

Bottom Line: The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults.We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition.Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa , Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Age-related face recognition deficits are characterized by high false alarms to unfamiliar faces, are not as pronounced for other complex stimuli, and are only partially related to general age-related impairments in cognition. This paper reviews some of the underlying processes likely to be implicated in theses deficits by focusing on areas where contradictions abound as a means to highlight avenues for future research. Research pertaining to the three following hypotheses is presented: (i) perceptual deterioration, (ii) encoding of configural information, and (iii) difficulties in recollecting contextual information. The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults. We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition. Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus