Limits...
On the particular vulnerability of face recognition to aging: a review of three hypotheses.

Boutet I, Taler V, Collin CA - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults.We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition.Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa , Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Age-related face recognition deficits are characterized by high false alarms to unfamiliar faces, are not as pronounced for other complex stimuli, and are only partially related to general age-related impairments in cognition. This paper reviews some of the underlying processes likely to be implicated in theses deficits by focusing on areas where contradictions abound as a means to highlight avenues for future research. Research pertaining to the three following hypotheses is presented: (i) perceptual deterioration, (ii) encoding of configural information, and (iii) difficulties in recollecting contextual information. The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults. We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition. Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of stimuli used to trigger within-class discriminations that are equivalent for faces (A) and other complex objects (B,C).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543816&req=5

Figure 2: Examples of stimuli used to trigger within-class discriminations that are equivalent for faces (A) and other complex objects (B,C).

Mentions: Three features of these face recognition deficits are particularly noteworthy. First, studies that have employed yes/no recognition paradigms indicate that this age-related deficit arises primarily from older adults having difficulty rejecting unfamiliar faces, with their ability to correctly recognize familiar faces being comparable to that of younger adults (for a review, see by Searcy et al., 1999). Second, age differences are more pronounced for faces than for other comparable recognition tasks including individual recognition of other objects (chairs and houses: Boutet and Faubert, 2006; watches: Meinhardt-Injac et al., 2014; see Figure 2, for examples) as well as recognition of inverted faces (Grady et al., 1994; Boutet and Faubert, 2006; Chaby et al., 2011, Experiment I; but see Obermeyer et al., 2012). The finding for inverted faces is particularly relevant to our discussion because inverted faces contain the same low-level information as upright ones. Indeed, finding larger differences between younger and older participants for upright relative to inverted faces suggests the implication of higher-order processes involved in normal face recognition per se, rather than information demands or lower-level processes. Third, general impairments in cognitive function and object recognition do not completely account for age-related face recognition deficits (Hildebrandt et al., 2011), suggesting that in addition to general functioning impairments (in memory, for example), face-specific factors must also be implicated. The latter two sets of results suggest that faces may also be special in the sense that their recognition appears to be more vulnerable to the aging process than that of other object categories.


On the particular vulnerability of face recognition to aging: a review of three hypotheses.

Boutet I, Taler V, Collin CA - Front Psychol (2015)

Examples of stimuli used to trigger within-class discriminations that are equivalent for faces (A) and other complex objects (B,C).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543816&req=5

Figure 2: Examples of stimuli used to trigger within-class discriminations that are equivalent for faces (A) and other complex objects (B,C).
Mentions: Three features of these face recognition deficits are particularly noteworthy. First, studies that have employed yes/no recognition paradigms indicate that this age-related deficit arises primarily from older adults having difficulty rejecting unfamiliar faces, with their ability to correctly recognize familiar faces being comparable to that of younger adults (for a review, see by Searcy et al., 1999). Second, age differences are more pronounced for faces than for other comparable recognition tasks including individual recognition of other objects (chairs and houses: Boutet and Faubert, 2006; watches: Meinhardt-Injac et al., 2014; see Figure 2, for examples) as well as recognition of inverted faces (Grady et al., 1994; Boutet and Faubert, 2006; Chaby et al., 2011, Experiment I; but see Obermeyer et al., 2012). The finding for inverted faces is particularly relevant to our discussion because inverted faces contain the same low-level information as upright ones. Indeed, finding larger differences between younger and older participants for upright relative to inverted faces suggests the implication of higher-order processes involved in normal face recognition per se, rather than information demands or lower-level processes. Third, general impairments in cognitive function and object recognition do not completely account for age-related face recognition deficits (Hildebrandt et al., 2011), suggesting that in addition to general functioning impairments (in memory, for example), face-specific factors must also be implicated. The latter two sets of results suggest that faces may also be special in the sense that their recognition appears to be more vulnerable to the aging process than that of other object categories.

Bottom Line: The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults.We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition.Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa , Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Age-related face recognition deficits are characterized by high false alarms to unfamiliar faces, are not as pronounced for other complex stimuli, and are only partially related to general age-related impairments in cognition. This paper reviews some of the underlying processes likely to be implicated in theses deficits by focusing on areas where contradictions abound as a means to highlight avenues for future research. Research pertaining to the three following hypotheses is presented: (i) perceptual deterioration, (ii) encoding of configural information, and (iii) difficulties in recollecting contextual information. The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults. We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition. Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

No MeSH data available.