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On the particular vulnerability of face recognition to aging: a review of three hypotheses.

Boutet I, Taler V, Collin CA - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults.We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition.Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa , Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Age-related face recognition deficits are characterized by high false alarms to unfamiliar faces, are not as pronounced for other complex stimuli, and are only partially related to general age-related impairments in cognition. This paper reviews some of the underlying processes likely to be implicated in theses deficits by focusing on areas where contradictions abound as a means to highlight avenues for future research. Research pertaining to the three following hypotheses is presented: (i) perceptual deterioration, (ii) encoding of configural information, and (iii) difficulties in recollecting contextual information. The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults. We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition. Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An example of bizarre experience elicited by faces whose spatial elements are denaturalized. (A) In the so-called Thatcher Illusion, the eyes and mouth of the upright face are turned upside-down. (B) The feeling of bizarreness produced by the manipulation disappears when the image is inverted.
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Figure 1: An example of bizarre experience elicited by faces whose spatial elements are denaturalized. (A) In the so-called Thatcher Illusion, the eyes and mouth of the upright face are turned upside-down. (B) The feeling of bizarreness produced by the manipulation disappears when the image is inverted.

Mentions: If you ask a layperson whether faces are special, most would not hesitate to answer “yes.” Indeed, one does not have to be well versed in the intricacies of visual information processing to appreciate that faces carry a wealth of information relevant for social interactions: information about the emotional status of others, the locus of attention (i.e., via gaze direction), gender, ethnic identity, age, etc. But for most people, the specialness of faces is experienced in reference to the crucial role they play in defining an individual’s identity. Indeed, the keen sense of identity derived from faces is well illustrated by striking examples of individuals who have had to acquaint themselves with a new identity following gross injuries to the face (e.g., Furr et al., 2007), by the bizarre experience elicited by faces whose spatial elements are denaturalized (e.g., Thompson, 1980; Figure 1), as well as by the profound impact that prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces, has on those affected as well as their relatives and friends (Yardley et al., 2008).


On the particular vulnerability of face recognition to aging: a review of three hypotheses.

Boutet I, Taler V, Collin CA - Front Psychol (2015)

An example of bizarre experience elicited by faces whose spatial elements are denaturalized. (A) In the so-called Thatcher Illusion, the eyes and mouth of the upright face are turned upside-down. (B) The feeling of bizarreness produced by the manipulation disappears when the image is inverted.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543816&req=5

Figure 1: An example of bizarre experience elicited by faces whose spatial elements are denaturalized. (A) In the so-called Thatcher Illusion, the eyes and mouth of the upright face are turned upside-down. (B) The feeling of bizarreness produced by the manipulation disappears when the image is inverted.
Mentions: If you ask a layperson whether faces are special, most would not hesitate to answer “yes.” Indeed, one does not have to be well versed in the intricacies of visual information processing to appreciate that faces carry a wealth of information relevant for social interactions: information about the emotional status of others, the locus of attention (i.e., via gaze direction), gender, ethnic identity, age, etc. But for most people, the specialness of faces is experienced in reference to the crucial role they play in defining an individual’s identity. Indeed, the keen sense of identity derived from faces is well illustrated by striking examples of individuals who have had to acquaint themselves with a new identity following gross injuries to the face (e.g., Furr et al., 2007), by the bizarre experience elicited by faces whose spatial elements are denaturalized (e.g., Thompson, 1980; Figure 1), as well as by the profound impact that prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces, has on those affected as well as their relatives and friends (Yardley et al., 2008).

Bottom Line: The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults.We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition.Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa , Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Age-related face recognition deficits are characterized by high false alarms to unfamiliar faces, are not as pronounced for other complex stimuli, and are only partially related to general age-related impairments in cognition. This paper reviews some of the underlying processes likely to be implicated in theses deficits by focusing on areas where contradictions abound as a means to highlight avenues for future research. Research pertaining to the three following hypotheses is presented: (i) perceptual deterioration, (ii) encoding of configural information, and (iii) difficulties in recollecting contextual information. The evidence surveyed provides support for the idea that all three factors are likely to contribute, under certain conditions, to the deficits in face recognition seen in older adults. We discuss how these different factors might interact in the context of a generic framework of the different stages implicated in face recognition. Several suggestions for future investigations are outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus