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Cross-age effects on forensic face construction.

Fodarella C, Brown C, Lewis A, Frowd CD - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: A separate group of participants who were familiar with the relevant identities attempted to name the resulting composites.For younger adults, age of target face did not influence correct naming and their composites were named at the same level as those constructed by older adults for younger targets.Overall, correct naming was fairly good across the experiment, and indicated benefit for older witnesses for older targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Winchester , Winchester, UK.

ABSTRACT
The own-age bias (OAB) refers to recognition memory being more accurate for people of our own age than other age groups (e.g., Wright and Stroud, 2002). This paper investigated whether the OAB effect is present during construction of human faces (also known as facial composites, often for forensic/police use). In doing so, it adds to our understanding of factors influencing both facial memory across the life span as well as performance of facial composites. Participant-witnesses were grouped into younger (19-35 years) and older (51-80 years) adults, and constructed a single composite from memory of an own- or cross-age target face using the feature-based composite system PRO-fit. They also completed the shortened version of the glasgow face matching test (GFMT; Burton et al., 2010). A separate group of participants who were familiar with the relevant identities attempted to name the resulting composites. Correct naming of the composites revealed the presence of an OAB for older adults, who constructed more-identifiable composites of own-age than cross-age faces. For younger adults, age of target face did not influence correct naming and their composites were named at the same level as those constructed by older adults for younger targets. Also, there was no reliable correlation between face perception ability and composite quality. Overall, correct naming was fairly good across the experiment, and indicated benefit for older witnesses for older targets. Results are discussed in terms of contemporary theories of OAB, and implications of the work for forensic practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example composites constructed of the professional footballer manager Arsene Wenger, an older age target (A) and the professional football player John Terry, a younger age target (B). The composites constructed by the younger age group are on the left, and those constructed by the older age group are on the right. Due to reasons of copyright, original pictures cannot be shown here.
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Figure 1: Example composites constructed of the professional footballer manager Arsene Wenger, an older age target (A) and the professional football player John Terry, a younger age target (B). The composites constructed by the younger age group are on the left, and those constructed by the older age group are on the right. Due to reasons of copyright, original pictures cannot be shown here.

Mentions: The 40 actual composites and the four foil composites were proportionally sized to 15 cm (high) by 10 cm (wide) and printed in greyscale (the image mode of the composite system) on A4 paper. Figure 1 below shows example items across conditions. The 20 color target photographs from the construction stage were also required.


Cross-age effects on forensic face construction.

Fodarella C, Brown C, Lewis A, Frowd CD - Front Psychol (2015)

Example composites constructed of the professional footballer manager Arsene Wenger, an older age target (A) and the professional football player John Terry, a younger age target (B). The composites constructed by the younger age group are on the left, and those constructed by the older age group are on the right. Due to reasons of copyright, original pictures cannot be shown here.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543797&req=5

Figure 1: Example composites constructed of the professional footballer manager Arsene Wenger, an older age target (A) and the professional football player John Terry, a younger age target (B). The composites constructed by the younger age group are on the left, and those constructed by the older age group are on the right. Due to reasons of copyright, original pictures cannot be shown here.
Mentions: The 40 actual composites and the four foil composites were proportionally sized to 15 cm (high) by 10 cm (wide) and printed in greyscale (the image mode of the composite system) on A4 paper. Figure 1 below shows example items across conditions. The 20 color target photographs from the construction stage were also required.

Bottom Line: A separate group of participants who were familiar with the relevant identities attempted to name the resulting composites.For younger adults, age of target face did not influence correct naming and their composites were named at the same level as those constructed by older adults for younger targets.Overall, correct naming was fairly good across the experiment, and indicated benefit for older witnesses for older targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Winchester , Winchester, UK.

ABSTRACT
The own-age bias (OAB) refers to recognition memory being more accurate for people of our own age than other age groups (e.g., Wright and Stroud, 2002). This paper investigated whether the OAB effect is present during construction of human faces (also known as facial composites, often for forensic/police use). In doing so, it adds to our understanding of factors influencing both facial memory across the life span as well as performance of facial composites. Participant-witnesses were grouped into younger (19-35 years) and older (51-80 years) adults, and constructed a single composite from memory of an own- or cross-age target face using the feature-based composite system PRO-fit. They also completed the shortened version of the glasgow face matching test (GFMT; Burton et al., 2010). A separate group of participants who were familiar with the relevant identities attempted to name the resulting composites. Correct naming of the composites revealed the presence of an OAB for older adults, who constructed more-identifiable composites of own-age than cross-age faces. For younger adults, age of target face did not influence correct naming and their composites were named at the same level as those constructed by older adults for younger targets. Also, there was no reliable correlation between face perception ability and composite quality. Overall, correct naming was fairly good across the experiment, and indicated benefit for older witnesses for older targets. Results are discussed in terms of contemporary theories of OAB, and implications of the work for forensic practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus