Limits...
Forms of aggression, peer relationships, and relational victimization among Chinese adolescent girls and boys: roles of prosocial behavior.

Wang S, Zhang W, Li D, Yu C, Zhen S, Huang S - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Through a sample of 686 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 13.73 years; 50% girls), we examined the compensatory and moderating effects of prosocial behavior on the direct and indirect associations between forms of aggression and relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent girls and boys.Next, we found that prosocial behavior indirectly counteracts the effects of aggression on relational victimization through reducing adolescents' peer rejection and promoting adolescents' peer attachment.Finally, we discussed the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology & Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Through a sample of 686 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 13.73 years; 50% girls), we examined the compensatory and moderating effects of prosocial behavior on the direct and indirect associations between forms of aggression and relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent girls and boys. The results indicated that only adolescent girls' relationally aggressive behaviors could be directly linked with their experiences of relational victimization, and both relationally and overtly aggressive adolescent boys and girls might be more often rejected by their peers, which, in turn, could make them targets of relational aggression. Next, we found that prosocial behavior indirectly counteracts the effects of aggression on relational victimization through reducing adolescents' peer rejection and promoting adolescents' peer attachment. In addition, relationally aggressive girls with high levels of prosocial behavior might be less rejected by peers; however, they might also have lower levels of peer attachment and be more likely to experience relational victimization. Last, adolescent boys scored higher on risks, but lower on the protective factors of relational victimization than girls, which, to some degree, might explain the gender difference in relational victimization. Finally, we discussed the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prosocial behavior compensates for the effects of relational and overt aggression on relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent boys (Model 2). The latent variables were depicted by ellipses, and the observable variables were depicted by rectangles. Standardized coefficients were provided. Pathways that were nonsignificant were not shown for clarity. RAgg, relational aggression, PBeh, prosocial behavior, OAgg, overt aggression, PRej, peer rejection, FNum, friend number, PAtt, peer attachment, RPV, relational victimization. ∗p ≤ 0.05, ∗∗p ≤ 0.01, ∗∗∗p ≤ 0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543795&req=5

Figure 2: Prosocial behavior compensates for the effects of relational and overt aggression on relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent boys (Model 2). The latent variables were depicted by ellipses, and the observable variables were depicted by rectangles. Standardized coefficients were provided. Pathways that were nonsignificant were not shown for clarity. RAgg, relational aggression, PBeh, prosocial behavior, OAgg, overt aggression, PRej, peer rejection, FNum, friend number, PAtt, peer attachment, RPV, relational victimization. ∗p ≤ 0.05, ∗∗p ≤ 0.01, ∗∗∗p ≤ 0.001.

Mentions: The path details of Model 1 and Model 2 are presented in Figures 1 and 2. For adolescent girls, relational aggression was both directly and indirectly associated with relational victimization partially mediated by peer rejection, whereas only the indirect link was found between overt aggression and relational victimization through peer rejection. For adolescent boys, both relational and overt aggression were found to indirectly correlate with relational victimization totally mediated by peer rejection. However, we failed to find any significant mediating effects of the other two aspects of peer relationships (i.e., number of friends and peer attachment) for neither the boys nor the girls. Although these findings suggested that our Hypothesis 1 is only partially supported, it is worth noting that peer attachment was negatively linked with relational victimization for girls, and both the number of friends and peer attachment were negatively associated with relational victimization for boys.


Forms of aggression, peer relationships, and relational victimization among Chinese adolescent girls and boys: roles of prosocial behavior.

Wang S, Zhang W, Li D, Yu C, Zhen S, Huang S - Front Psychol (2015)

Prosocial behavior compensates for the effects of relational and overt aggression on relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent boys (Model 2). The latent variables were depicted by ellipses, and the observable variables were depicted by rectangles. Standardized coefficients were provided. Pathways that were nonsignificant were not shown for clarity. RAgg, relational aggression, PBeh, prosocial behavior, OAgg, overt aggression, PRej, peer rejection, FNum, friend number, PAtt, peer attachment, RPV, relational victimization. ∗p ≤ 0.05, ∗∗p ≤ 0.01, ∗∗∗p ≤ 0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543795&req=5

Figure 2: Prosocial behavior compensates for the effects of relational and overt aggression on relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent boys (Model 2). The latent variables were depicted by ellipses, and the observable variables were depicted by rectangles. Standardized coefficients were provided. Pathways that were nonsignificant were not shown for clarity. RAgg, relational aggression, PBeh, prosocial behavior, OAgg, overt aggression, PRej, peer rejection, FNum, friend number, PAtt, peer attachment, RPV, relational victimization. ∗p ≤ 0.05, ∗∗p ≤ 0.01, ∗∗∗p ≤ 0.001.
Mentions: The path details of Model 1 and Model 2 are presented in Figures 1 and 2. For adolescent girls, relational aggression was both directly and indirectly associated with relational victimization partially mediated by peer rejection, whereas only the indirect link was found between overt aggression and relational victimization through peer rejection. For adolescent boys, both relational and overt aggression were found to indirectly correlate with relational victimization totally mediated by peer rejection. However, we failed to find any significant mediating effects of the other two aspects of peer relationships (i.e., number of friends and peer attachment) for neither the boys nor the girls. Although these findings suggested that our Hypothesis 1 is only partially supported, it is worth noting that peer attachment was negatively linked with relational victimization for girls, and both the number of friends and peer attachment were negatively associated with relational victimization for boys.

Bottom Line: Through a sample of 686 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 13.73 years; 50% girls), we examined the compensatory and moderating effects of prosocial behavior on the direct and indirect associations between forms of aggression and relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent girls and boys.Next, we found that prosocial behavior indirectly counteracts the effects of aggression on relational victimization through reducing adolescents' peer rejection and promoting adolescents' peer attachment.Finally, we discussed the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology & Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Through a sample of 686 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 13.73 years; 50% girls), we examined the compensatory and moderating effects of prosocial behavior on the direct and indirect associations between forms of aggression and relational victimization mediated by peer relationships among adolescent girls and boys. The results indicated that only adolescent girls' relationally aggressive behaviors could be directly linked with their experiences of relational victimization, and both relationally and overtly aggressive adolescent boys and girls might be more often rejected by their peers, which, in turn, could make them targets of relational aggression. Next, we found that prosocial behavior indirectly counteracts the effects of aggression on relational victimization through reducing adolescents' peer rejection and promoting adolescents' peer attachment. In addition, relationally aggressive girls with high levels of prosocial behavior might be less rejected by peers; however, they might also have lower levels of peer attachment and be more likely to experience relational victimization. Last, adolescent boys scored higher on risks, but lower on the protective factors of relational victimization than girls, which, to some degree, might explain the gender difference in relational victimization. Finally, we discussed the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus